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herewegoinvt
27
May 25, 2017
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If you want to ruin a knife, crossed carbide is a great way to do that. I don't use this product (though I use a similar system), Wicked Edge describes it very well with pictures https://www.wickededgeusa.com/comparisons-of-knife-sharpeners/
May 25, 2017
namhod
1981
May 26, 2017
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Came to say this. If you hate your blades use a pull through sharpener! The carbide will strip metal from the edge.
Now the one redeeming quality of pull through sharpeners. The ceramic side is an easy, super quick way to hone your edge between sharpenings. A couple passes through the ceramic side with no pressure but the weight of the knife applied and your edge has new life in it.
May 26, 2017
herewegoinvt
27
May 26, 2017
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If they sold this with epoxy to completely cover the carbide, I'd think of buying it!
May 26, 2017
Krustyboomer
70
May 26, 2017
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You realize to actually sharpen you have to remove metal, right? There is a difference between sharpening, honing, and steeling. Kind of. And don't forget stropping! Anything with abrasives in the mix will remove metal. It's all in the technique as to whether you screw things up or not. But trying to use a flat blade on a round honing steel is a recipe for disaster. I prefer whetstones to sharpen. I will use a ceramic rod jig or even the unglazed bottom of a ceramic dish if I'm desparate.
May 26, 2017
namhod
1981
May 26, 2017
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You don't want to actually SEE metal flaking off...
Also, since we are now being technical. "Steeling" is honing.
May 26, 2017
Krustyboomer
70
May 26, 2017
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The definition seems to float. A steel is just a steel and is meant to straighten an edge. A "honing" steel typically means abrasive, like ceramic (Idahone rod). That actually sharpens. But some definitions say honing is just straightening, others say sharpening. I agree steel should not be "flaking" off anytime.
May 26, 2017
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