All-American Pressure Canners & Cookers
All-American Pressure Canners & Cookers
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Product Description
Whether you’re canning meat, veggies, fish, or fruit, All-American pressure cookers provide a safe and effective way to do so—and it’s been that way since 1930. Featuring an exclusive metal-to-metal sealing system, they help preserve your foods for years to come Read More

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Wolverines
23
Feb 16, 2019
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I have the model 921. Since I grow vegetables, I wanted to be able to preserve my crops and wanted something American made that doesn't use a rubber gasket. Think I paid around $220 several years ago, direct from the manufacturer. I don't remember the capacity, but it holds a double stack of pint jars, where most other canners don't. The All-American is made in Wisconsin, USA, from billet aluminum and uses no gasket. The only drawback is trying to get the lid off after a canning session. It requires prying with a small pry bar to break the seal. I've also got a Presto pressure canner, but that requires the gasket to be replaced sometimes and it doesn't hold nearly the amount of the 921. Also, Presto is made in China. It's fine for the money and it does the job, but the quality just isn't there. It's much thinner and does not have a gauge. The All-American canners look like industrial hardware and they are built like it.
(Edited)
Feb 16, 2019
bootster1
91
Feb 17, 2019
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There certainly is "something in the manual about it". If you read it, you would have known what to do. I'm sorry to be so blunt, but the manual clearly tells you what to do to lubricate the the seal.
Feb 17, 2019
Wolverines
23
Feb 20, 2019
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Well I couldn't find the manual that came with it, but I found the pdf version online and sure enough, it's there. Thanks again.
Feb 20, 2019
Chefmike66
0
Jan 17, 2019
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I got the 25 qt model and I'm really happy about it. It was a great deal, I think I paid $230. I've long wanted to get a pressure cooker to make shelf-stable jars of food. Here's a heads-up, the capacity in quart jars is the same (7) for three sizes. I didn't realize this, and it's no big deal; the pint capacity is actually different between the three. However, I could've bought a size smaller for my needs and it wouldn't have mattered. Go to the All-American website and check it out. Or, like I didn't, don't. This thing is going to outlast me, no doubt.
Jan 17, 2019
Spencerian
1
Jan 8, 2019
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Anybody pressure cook deep fried chicken in oil? What is the flashpoint for oil, where oil bursts into flames? This is all very dangerous, but if I can get KFC style pressure cooked fried chicken in 10 minutes, I'm down for the drop.
Jan 8, 2019
billc
361
Feb 16, 2019
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This is not the type of pressure vessel you want for cooking. You can use it for cooking, but it‘s clumsy for the task vs more modern pressure cookers and more dangerous. This one is designed for canning, and it’s the best on the market for that purpose, IMO. Those meant for pressure cooking have more safety features. I like the Fagor brand. Mine has redundant pressure release types and can even be opened (somewhat) safely under pressure. It isn’t MEANT to be opened under pressure, of course, but you’ll survive it if you do. Pressure CANNERS run higher pressure and the American locks the lid with a bunch of bolts which have to be locked down properly. Faster to cook - more pressure. Slower to release pressure and slower to open - you’ll likely miss your cooking time. While the American does have a weight with multiple pressures, it’s still slower to open and close. My fagor has ONE handle to close/lock/open. Easy-peasy.
Feb 16, 2019
ms
77
Feb 16, 2019
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Don't use a conventional pressure cooker/canner for pressure frying. If you do, you're effectively creating a bomb full of screamingly hot oil. Pressure fryers are another animal entirely, and the smallest you can probably get hold of would be catering size if not commercial/industrial.
Feb 16, 2019
RayF
16079
Jan 4, 2019
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Wondering if the manufacturers warranty covers use of this vessel to cryogenically freeze my head after--you know, like, after I'm gone?
Jan 4, 2019
ChadMCarleton
89
Jan 4, 2019
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Covered.
Jan 4, 2019
RayF
16079
Jan 4, 2019
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Not that I'd be around to debate the issue should a problem arise...
Jan 4, 2019
SidPost
70
Jan 4, 2019
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For people that want to know what these hold in other sizes: http://www.allamericancanner.com/All-American-Pressure-Canners.htm
Jan 4, 2019
Thrift_First_Retail_Last
48
Jan 3, 2019
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Not for absent-minded people!
Jan 3, 2019
AJAugust
286
Jan 3, 2019
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Homeland Security will need a list of everyone who joins in on this ‘drop. No really... they are.
Jan 3, 2019
Moristar
29
Jan 3, 2019
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I didn't know that bomb was made from a pressure cooker. Thanks.
Jan 3, 2019
AJAugust
286
Jan 3, 2019
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Obviously, I was only kidding about Homeland Security..., but it is true, pressure cookers like these have been and continue to be among the main components for bomb assembly. Let’s assume that for the sake of this ‘drop, everyone one is going to use their new (expensive) cooker only for food preparation and preservation :)
Jan 3, 2019
megabyteme
2
Nov 23, 2018
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This has been one of my happiest purchases. Every inch is built like a tank, designed to be past down to your grandchildren. Beautiful, beyond sturdy, and designed flawlessly. Compare to Amazon prices, then grab one that best suits your needs.
Nov 23, 2018
Gunnersmate2
1462
Nov 20, 2018
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The prices are different on the description page for the larger pots. One spot says the 41.5q is +$50 and then right below its +$170 for the 41.5q that's a huge difference in price.
Nov 20, 2018