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KarlBlessing
130
Jul 22, 2015
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Is it a #6 or #5 nib for the generic nib being used? (because I'd imagine some people would like to swap it out for something else, especially if whoever makes the kit pen doesn't tune the nib of each one).
edit: From the review above, that seems like a really tiny pen.
Jul 22, 2015
JonasHeineman
5952
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Jul 23, 2015
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Hey @KarlBlessing I'm not sure offhand, but I will ask about this.
Jul 23, 2015
KarlBlessing
130
Jul 27, 2015
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Thanks. Hopefully you can get an answer. Most of the pen folks I know are going to care about the nib, if the nib isn't any good, the pen itself is kind of worthless, especially if they can't swap it out for something they know.
Jul 27, 2015
benincanada
14
Jul 28, 2015
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I agree with Karl. In general, maybe skip the "kit pens"
From the review linked to above: "Sadly this love and care isn’t carried over to the hardware. The clip is sturdy but feels and looks cheaply made. The cap screws onto the barrel nicely but is hard to thread onto the end to post. The nib is a generic two-tone medium-only affair."
Jul 28, 2015
JonasHeineman
5952
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Jul 28, 2015
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Hey @KarlBlessing -- I was able to confirm that the nib is a #5 size.
Jul 28, 2015
KarlBlessing
130
Jul 30, 2015
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Good to know (PS: #6 seems to be more popular, since some people will buy a pen for materials, but will refrain if there's not a lot of alternative nib options, such as the case of a #5)
But kit pens in general don't normally interest me, especially when the person who assembles them picks the most generic and common 'kit pen' design they can with the only possible difference being the appearance of the wood/plastic/acrylic in between the generic parts. Most of the pen turners (ie: as in turning a lathe) I see online don't have much specialties in pens, and treat the fountain pens like the ballpoints/rollerballs and don't take into consideration nib/feed tuning or some of the aspects that may make them uncomfortable as a fountain pen but decent as a RB/BP.
Nutshell : The wood appearance/material is the only thing in my opinion that sets it off from functional pens half it's price (which course does have some to do with machining, but as stated before if nibs were tuned, and design was something other than the "kit pen" look, it'd be more justifiable), also at 100, something like a Desiderata is more desirable, as the whole pen is usually turned, and care is taken to tuning the nib and feed as its supposed to provide higher performance flex from dip nibs (Something that would fail miserably if not probably tuned at the feed/section).
Kit pens make nice gifts for appearance sakes, but seldom make good functional pens when the only difference is the material cut to the kit's specs. (as opposed to custom pen makers that produce an entire pen from scratch and have expertise in tuning it to write).
Jul 30, 2015
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