Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z Poles
Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z Poles
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Product Description
Among the most popular trekking poles with members of the Ultralight Community, the Black Diamond Distance Carbon Z poles start at just 9 ounces per pair—and feature a 100-percent carbon fiber construction that makes them incredibly strong for their weight. The foldable three-section design gives you fast deployment when you need it, while the breathable, moisture-wicking EVA grip ensures a secure hold ... Read More

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cwmst22
88
May 19, 2019
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Currently $127.39 at REI during their anniversary sale so you’d get them quicker than the June 11 MD ship date. https://www.rei.com/product/127493
May 19, 2019
cwmst22
88
May 20, 2019
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$108 at Campsaver.com Outlet using SPSV2020 coupon code to get 20% off any Outlet item. ($127.46 before coupon) shipped for free. https://www.campsaver.com/black-diamond-distance-carbon-z-trekking-poles-equqo.html
May 20, 2019
LAB19
1
May 18, 2019
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i had a pair for almost 2 years. On the pro side: Ultra light +++, very quick set up and breakdown, extremely small when folded up. The cons: one pole broke near the handle right at the release button, seems to be a weak point, they don’t adjust at all so if you have to have poles to hold your tent up you’re out of luck, The wrist straps fray and are somewhat abrasive, not real comfortable on your wrist. Ultimately I’m going to replace with something slightly heavier with Leiki
May 18, 2019
garybolen
51
Dec 20, 2017
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So I bought these poles from REI at the normal price and really liked them BUT, I ultimately ended up purchasing their adjustable version because I use them to set up my Zpacks Duplex tent. It's not too big of a deal, but setting up on uneven ground without being able to adjust the height of the poles can be kind of funky.
Having said that, if you aren't using your poles to set up your tent or if you don't mind a little tent funk on uneven ground, then these are awesome poles and that is a very good price. Also, I've not really noticed any benefit from using the rubber tip. I would switch them with the included carbide tip (but that's just me).
Dec 20, 2017
Anybody getting away with using these in the snow and below freezing?
Dec 17, 2017
nathann
22
Sep 14, 2017
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I have these in the FLZ model (adjustable height at the handle) and have now broken 2 of them. I broke one last year and got a replacement through warranty. Took it on the Tahoe Rim Trail this year and they broke again. Remember that they're very light and fragile, not made to handle pressure/stress perpendicular to the pole itself.
I beat up my Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Corks and they handle everything I throw at them.
After replacement, I now have 2 good Distance Carbon poles, but not sure I want to take them out anymore. Can't trust them to not break on me.
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Sep 14, 2017
Eatmydust
81
Sep 15, 2017
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Buy Leki's
Sep 15, 2017
gilmanw
10
Sep 14, 2017
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In the pictures, the model is using the straps in an inefficient way! Best to insert your hand into the strap from below. when the pole is gripped, the strap ends should be in your palm with the middle of the strap across the back of your hand. That way when you really lean into the pole grip (such as when descending), the pressure is partly distributed by the strap across the back of the hand rather than entirely within your grip. It also reduces the risk of injury if your grip on the pole handle slips. Basically the same grip that your ski instructor probably taught you for your ski poles. OF course, everyone has an opinion, which is why I used the term "inefficient" rather than the more definitive "wrong". BTW, the Black Diamond Carbon Z Pole straps are designed so that the straps form an open loop when hanging loose, making it quite easy to enter from below and use this grip technique. The straps do a great job of distributing the pressure across the back of your hand.
Sep 14, 2017
rvonzo1
4
Sep 13, 2017
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Has anybody had an issue with the straps? I've borrowed these before from a friend, and the strap wasn't very comfortable and was fraying. Cut into the hand a bit....not nearly as comfortable as other poles I've used. Thoughts? Has anybody tried to replace them?
Sep 13, 2017
orzc
1
Sep 12, 2017
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Im thinking about buying this product, but I wonder about what size shold i take? My height is 184 cm, and ill be glad for some help about this decision.
Sep 12, 2017
Itaios
0
Sep 12, 2017
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130 will be GOOD for you
Sep 12, 2017
Eatmydust
81
Sep 15, 2017
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Not necessarily, if you have long arms a 120 might be better. best to try before you buy. pole guide says I should use 130 but 120 turned out to be perfect because I have longer arms.
Sep 15, 2017
blarneydude
0
Sep 11, 2017
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These are the best poles I have used. It is not about making the ultra possible but the 10 to 15 more fun, and as a friend of mine who is a kickass peakbagger and ultralught long trail hiker puts it: less weight equals more fun. (His poles are heavier.)
Sep 11, 2017
PStu
5
Sep 11, 2017
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I have a pair and would love them if I had gotten the right size. They were a gift, and it took me several hiking trips to realize that they were just too long. I ended up going with an inexpensive set of adjustable carbon-fiber poles that I lengthen on long downhills and shorten on long uphill climbs. The BD poles also won't work if you're setting up a shelter using hiking poles as support. Otherwise, if you've got the fit right, these are great poles that feel featherweight in the hand.
Sep 11, 2017
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