Showing 1 of 53 conversations about:
waylo
66
Nov 15, 2015
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I purchased these exact earbuds from Amazon roughly 6-8 months ago for $20. They lasted me all of a month before the left one stopped working all together. I wasn't rough with them either. In fact, they literally never left my desk. Used them a handful of times while doing Illustrator/Photoshop work until one day I put them in and noticed the problem.
Tossed 'em in the trash and went back to my Monoprice 8320's, which also sound better.
Nov 15, 2015
timo
140
Nov 15, 2015
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It's funny, I had exactly the same problem (among several others) with the 8320s I tried once.
Nov 15, 2015
ProgressiveIce
49
Nov 15, 2015
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"Tossed 'em in the trash"
Please recycle electronic products rather than throwing them in the trash.
Nov 15, 2015
Measlyblue
41
Nov 17, 2015
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How would you go about recycling these I could understand recycling with big cans but these are to small :/
Nov 17, 2015
ProgressiveIce
49
Nov 17, 2015
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Sure, they don't contain vast amounts of recyclable material, but why would that mean that they're not recyclable? They still contain considerable amounts of copper and other metals, for example. I'm not sure about IEMs in particular, but there can also be environmentally dangerous substances in some small electronics (e.g. mercury)...
Nov 17, 2015
Dorcus_Maximus
5
Nov 19, 2015
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Earbuds are not electronic. Electronic generally means the inclusion of transistors or microchips -- i.e. active components (not including vacuum tubes :-)). Speakers are just wire and magnets. If you add in crossover networks you still are just talking about passive components. IEMs are probably not a concern when it comes to mercury. What minuscule amount of solder is in there is likely to be ROHS compliant.
Nov 19, 2015
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