CRKT Full Throttle Spring-Assisted Folding Knife
CRKT Full Throttle Spring-Assisted Folding Knife
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Product Description
Fast and ready for action, the CRKT Full Throttle is the latest from Matthew Lerch. Originally trained as a jeweler, the Wisconsin knifemaker’s designs are noted for their ornate aesthetic appeal Read More

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Ben24
59
Feb 10, 2020
Crkt already had a knife named the full throttle haha
(Edited)
reswright
2842
Feb 8, 2020
I used to like assisted opening knives, and don't anymore. Learning something's got an actual spring assist is usually enough for me to skip it now, for two reasons. the first is that for me, a thumb stud or a thumb disk or a flip tab or a button lock or an axis lock all usually mean that I can snap the blade open on my own without a spring assist. The second is, switchblades exist, and if I'm going to go the assisted route I might as well take it the rest of the way. Kinda a third reason is that with a lot of spring assists -- Gerber in particular -- the spring setup causes some grating in the action as metal grinds on metal. They're really cheap setups -- just a piece of metal with tension on it that's connected to the pivot and the other end anchored in the frame. I really don't like things that grate while opening or closing, but most AO setups give you that one way or another. Once upon a time I loved CRKT knives, but nowadays they're just a bullshit marketing company that pretends to have a stars-and-stripes American identity while making exactly zero knives with American labor, and builds everything with bottom end materials. A knife that could be great, like the Crawford Kasper, if it were made with XHP and carbon fiber is instead only ok because it's made of 8Cr and thermoplastic. Wish they'd pull their head out of their ass, but I'm not counting on it happening anytime soon.
reswright
2842
Feb 15, 2020
It's got its strengths. Good ergonomics, very thin and light. If I had to ding it on something I'd say the construction's a little TOO simple -- Kershaw does this thing where instead of having screws on both sides of the scale, they mostly only have them on one side, and coming out the other side of the other scale. Works but looks a little rough. As someone who takes 'em apart, they could spend a little more dough and do torx fasteners on both sides like everyone else. Still, a decent pickup. I see why people like it. MB Drop should give a run.
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There seems to be a lot of versions available. I considered your suggestion to go with the stainless one. I usually like things to be a little different from normal in whatever I'm upgrading, like a better scale or a better steel or something, so it didn't come to me naturally to go with the base version, but the long and short of it is that none of the spicy variations really seemed all that spicy. I would have bought the CF San Mai if the core steel had been something more suitable to a thinned edge than D2. It wasn't, it was D2. So going with the stainless version was a good call, in terms of the weight and distribution of steel handles vs. the aluminum and so on. Feels like the balance point would be way forward with a lightweight handle. Knife's too light for it to make sense to go with a superlight handle unless you've thinned the blade down even more and I'm not sure that'd be an improvement. Good call, Ray.
RayF
22271
Feb 15, 2020
I could go for a nicer version too, but as you mention, the others offered are mostly cosmetic variations of the base model. Glad you like it, but be careful—they’re easy to lose! I’m on my third...
BlueTom
327
Feb 8, 2020
The blade steel is a turn-off for me to be sure, and so is the blade length, but man do I love the aesthetics. I'm ambivalent about the assisted opener - can take it or leave it - but that downward angle sabre-grind blade just does it for me. CRKT needs to do this backwards from the way they normally do - answer the demand for a larger knife of the exact same design rather than the more common approach of making a "compact" (or whatever) version of a popular design as what seems many times like an afterthought. I'm tellin' ya CRKT, you'd hit a home run with a 3.9" blade and better steel, even just D2 to keep costs down would be better than the 8Cr13MoV you've got here. We are a fairly knowledgeable and discerning group of knife-aholics here and many of us would reward you with a purchase if you addressed our criticisms of this under-built, but nonetheless beautiful and useful design, if you just add an inch to the blade and handle.
ponagathos
492
Feb 8, 2020
It is a good looking shape. That is why I clicked the link in the first place. I would likely pick it up with upgraded size and materials. As someone else mentioned, CRKT is not cutting it these days. Kershaw has been putting out decent knives with M390 for $80, along with all these newer brands releasing really nicely done inexpensive knives. The last CRKT I picked up was a fixed fighting knife a few years ago at closeout prices.
rumata13
422
Feb 8, 2020
under 3 inches? no, thanks
Rudolph
268
Feb 8, 2020
Yep, another let down of a year for me with CRKT ! I thought maybe, just maybe they'd try a little upgrade in the budget end, but no. 2020 seems they'll keep up with the 8cr13 & the occasional 8cr14 even with CIVIVI, Bestech, CJRB, even Kershaw (Kershaw actually reworked a few popular older 8cr designs in D2) , to name a few offering D2 at $40, $50, and $60 brackets. I always think CRKT has promise with eye catching designs and popular designer colabs. But at least for me it's hard to buy for looks alone, when for the same and even less money you can buy better materials and quite possibly quality !
anonomous
559
Feb 8, 2020
Crkt is the worst brand around. Doo doo. 8cr13mov and even if they try new steels, they will fail in heat treatment, meaning you won't be getting the steel you wanted as it will under perform. The use of poor material, poor quality control, poor design and engineering etc. Not to mention crkt just goto the lowest bidder to manufacture there knives... They cost between $5 and $20 to manufacture and charge a whole lot more than they are even worth and rope people in with gimmicks or popular makers names. It's all trash and you can get alot of other brands with better qc and materials for cheaper than crkt. Ruike, realsteel, Kizer vanguard etc just way better knives for the cost.
ponagathos
492
Feb 8, 2020
This is way too expensive for a less than 3" knife with 8Cr13MoV steel.
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