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reswright
2231
Nov 21, 2019
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I've bought a few knives through this site, and I think dollar for dollar this is the best Massdrop branded knife. No shade on the other designers -- out of them all, in terms of value this one's just the best in my books. Incidentally it's the first one of the lot I picked up, and mine did not come perfect -- it had a relatively minor imperfection on the grind, one it would have been impossible to even notice if it were a coated blade, but when you spend a benjamin on a knife one of the things you're paying for is the expectation that you won't be dealing with little trifles, in my book. So given that, why do I say that pound for pound it's best?
  • It's a very useful size -- big enough to be effective at the tasks at which we use a pocket knife, but not so big to be unwieldy to use, or to alarm coworkers if you need to open a box in their presence.
  • It's got a great blade - wicked grind, super steel, hint of a thumb ramp with some good jimping on it for thumb grip. For what it's worth, very stabbity. But simple. I love interesting grinds but I have a profound respect for people who change things up without making them busy in a design sense, and Zinker's Dogtooth qualifies as a a strong example of that in action.
  • It has a nonstandard flipper with cool geometry, smart use of leverage, and consequently a very light pull. Some flippers dig your thumb up -- it's generally easy to flip this open however you like, and with the correct flip motion the Dogtooth fires like the flipper's some kinda switchblade button. Legit snikt.
  • It's slim. These days, esp. with Chinese made knives, the overwhelming trend is toward thicker substantial blades. Pocket knives have started to get blades as thick as combat knives. People like that and there's a place for it, but not every pocket knife has to be visibly overengineered - and the truth is, if you're paying for super steel, you don't need something that thick to get a knife that rugged. If your knife is well designed (and this is a Zinker) and it's made of good materials (this is G-10, Ti and S35VN) and it is from a shop that knows how to, and can be counted on actually give the steel a professional treatment dictated by the type of steel (and this is from We Knife, who are arguably the best the Chinese have at making proper production knives at scale) then it will live up to serious work year after year even if it has slim dimensions like the Dogtooth. And why's that matter? Well, for doing the things you actually do most of all, like opening letters and boxes and cutting cardboard, where you're frequently fitting the tip or edge of the blade into something or down along a tape seam, a slim blade profile is superior.
While we're on that subject -- a very common thing people experience with knives like this is that once you start spending $100 or more on a knife, you might be hesitant to use it at full go. It's understandable, but the truth is, when you buy a knife like this, the value it brings is that you CAN use it at full go, year after year, and it'll bear that use. You own it. Don't let it own you. That's what you're paying extra for.
Nov 21, 2019
ecoleman
692
Mar 12, 2020
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Totally agree, I own a half-dozen MD collaboration knives and this one is absolutely my favorite.
Mar 12, 2020
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