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Drop + EPOS PC38X Gaming Headset
$149
$169

Drop + EPOS PC38X Gaming Headset

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$149
$169
Product Description
An upgraded version of the crowd-favorite PC37X, our PC38X gaming headset is a level up in comfort, build quality, and sonic performance. Now, to celebrate Sennheiser Gaming’s rebrand to EPOS, the PC38X is launching in a new all-black colorway Read More
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4.8
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151
Nov 26, 2021
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A Great Headset in a Welcome New Colorway
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Hey everyone! I've spent the last couple of weeks with the new Drop PC38X. It's just as great as ever. Apart from the new colorway, this is the same headset and that's a good thing. I reviewed the original when it released last year (review here) and found it to be excellent. A solid upgrade from the PC37X and one of the best analog gaming headsets you can find at this price point. I'll go over the details in brief here, but be sure to check out the last review for more in-depth thoughts. They're the same headset, so everything I said there applies here.
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Just like before, you have a detailed sound with outstanding directionality and great soundstage. For competitive shooters, it's a great fit because you'll be able to pick out important cues like footsteps and tell where they're coming from. When people talk about great stereo being better than mediocre surround sound, this is the kind of experience they're talking about. In fact, I recently swapped out a headset from another big brand that rhymes with ...rogitech... for these on console. Really good stuff. They're also very comfortable and are great for comms. They're lightweight enough that you can wear them for a long time without experiencing any discomfort. The pads are plus and, like last time, you're given two sets to choose which works best for you. The smooth fabric comes preinstalled but velour alternates are also included for a more pillowy feel.
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The mic is great. Hands-down one of the best available in a gaming headset. You could use it for streaming in a pinch, but it is above and beyond for chatting with teammates, Discord, and even taking meetings. On that note, colorway. The originals had this black and yellow color scheme that didn't look bad but weren't a great fit for use in an office or remote meetings. The all-black is sleek and can fit into any scenario. Overall, these remain a solid buy but even more so if you needed something more subdued than black and yellow. A great headset with a very much in-demand new colorway. Score: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Would recommend to a friend.
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Drop + EPOS PC38x Black - Now with Less Yellow
Drop + EPOS PC38x Black - Now with Less Yellow
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Disclaimer: The EPOS PC38x was sent to me by DROP, they did not do anything to influence my opinion.


Introduction     This review won't be like my normal ones, as I have already reviewed this headset and the review will be linked below. Drop offered to send one of these my way so I could listen and test it and assure people that this is the same as when it was branded with Sennheisers name. In fact, this is made by the exact same team, just a new name. So a very quick briefing about who EPOS is.    2 companies Sennheiser and Demant decided to join and have a working relationship. Under this joint effort, they formed Sennheiser Communication A/S. This was the team that would go to make the Sennheiser branded gaming headsets and Bluetooth headphones. So the more consumer side of Sennheiser portfolio. But recently as most of you should know by now there was a demerger and the companies split up. When this happened the Sennheiser Comunication A/S team ended up being fully owned by Demant and were renamed to EPOS (pretty much). At first it was odd that Sennheiser would seemingly give up full control but now with the sale of the consumer headphone division of Senheiser it makes a lot more sense.    Part of this deal is EPOS would continue to sell the products they have worked on for years, but anything released under there time at Sennheiser would be CO branded. EPOS | Sennheiser So here we are, the Sennheiser Gaming and Communication Team is now called EPOS. If I'm not mistaken this is the first Sennheiser product to be fully rebranded. The PC38x has fully dropped the Sennheiser branding. Does this mean more will follow like the PC37x or GSP series, only time will tell.   Original Review Link
Website Link For This Review
 
Headphone Specs:
  • Form factor: Over ear
  • Transducer principle: Dynamic, open
  • Frequency response: 10Hz - 30000Hz
  • Impedance: 28 Ω
  • Sound pressure level: 109 dB
  • 2.5 m PC cable, 2 x 3.5 mm split TRS connector
  • 1.5 m console cable, 1 x 3.5 mm TRRS connector
  • Weight: 8.9 oz (253 g)
  • Weight (with cable): 10.2 oz (290.5g)
Microphone Specs:
  • Microphone frequency response: 50-16,000 Hz
  • Pick-up pattern: Noise-cancelling
  • Sensitivity: -38dBV/PA
  • Microphone technology: Electret condenser
  • Microphone pickup pattern: Bi-directional
Included:
  • 2 removable cables (PC and console)
  • 2 pairs of earpads (mesh knit and velour)
  • Drawstring travel pouch
  • 2-year manufacturer’s warranty
Changes   Not a lot has changed here. 
  • Gone is the controversial yellow that I still actually prefer, it is now replaced with simple, yet popular black. 
  • The cable is also now all black and a slightly different material but the same quality. But I have to frustratingly talk about this yet again. The cable is packaged in a folded up bunch meaning there will be lots of kinks in it. This is not how cables should be packed, roll them up in a circle to prevent kinks from forming in the box. Please change this eventually. If I'm not mistaken the GSP5500/600 already does this, so all EPOS products should as well.
  • The velour pads are slightly different, but this is most likely just normal pad batch variation. They're a bit softer and thicker in texture. They're also slightly less plush. But extremely close. Also do note this was comparing the pads to the brand new PC38x velour pads on my second PC38x unit.
  • Gone is the white Sennheiser logo and branding and replacing it is a black glossy EPOS logo and branding.
  • The cloth bag no longer has a white DROP logo but just a small black +.

Graphs

Disclaimer: My measurement rig is an industry standard clone. So it's accurate up to 3k compared to most GRAS rigs. Over 3k it's fairly off so ignore that tell I get a better calibration. When I talk about tonality and tuning it's based mostly on what I hear.  
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Above are the averaged measurements of the 2 Sennheiser PC38x units I have along with the new EPOS PC38x. As you can see they are very close. There is some deviation that is audible between units and that's just bass extension and upper mids like shown in the graph. But it's not too bad and falls into the excepted unit variation and seal variation. For anyone wondering if it is maybe pad variation, that does make up for some differences but when measuring with all the same pads they remained slightly different. But fall close enough to be considered the exact same.  
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This is just something I don't think I ever posted measurements for but have spoken about a lot. This is what happens when you use the volume wheel and why I tell people not to use it. It's fine to use to quickly lower volume if you need to, but when your actually using the headset keep it maxed and adjust volume on your source. As the wheel gets lower the bass blooms really bad making the headset sound muddy and slow and just bass gets a lot worse.  So when you put on your PC37x, PC38x or make sure you turn the volume wheel to max and adjust via your source. I actually would just tape the wheel in place if I daily drove this.   Conclusion   So what does this all mean? Well, this is just a long winded way of saying the Drop + EPOS PC38x Black is still the exact same headset as the Drop + Sennheiser PC38x Yellow.  So if you were at all nervous about this name change and worried that this may somehow not be the same headset you originally wanted, fear not, it is the same just now in a much more neutral and consumer-friendly black colour. 5 Stars I would recommend it.
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Would recommend to a friend.
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BobT36
1
Nov 26, 2021
Yeah, closed back ones make me feel claustrophobic and as if my ears have too much pressure. Anyway, what wire and pop filter did you use? And did this affect the mic quality at all? Reading some amazon reviews, many people mentioned they had to set the mic boost setting to full just so they could be heard, even with it bare.
MrJuiceMane
9
Nov 26, 2021
A random pop filter on Amazon. There were like 10 in a bag for a few bucks. The cable is from Amazon as well. It’s a new fantasia brand with a 2.5mm to 3.5mm. Mic works great for me. Never had any complaints. I’m on PS5.
RJSLBS
75
Nov 3, 2021
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DROP + Sennheiser PC38X review
This is a summarised version of my review posted on Everyday Listening. For a more in-depth breakdown of features and performance, see my full review linked above. Design & Build

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One may expect a flimsy, creaky plastic construction from an affordable gaming headset; most of which boasting flashy designs intended to photograph well, but rarely hold up in person. The PC38X thankfully doesn’t fall into that category. While its predominately plastic build feels very lightweight, it does feel well put together with tight tolerances and zero squeaks, wobbles or creeks as you’d expect from a company like Sennheiser. The design will be familiar to Sennheiser fans, this is a slender, relatively low-profile open-back over-ear. Subjectively, they look professional and refreshingly elegant, especially in the gaming space. Of course, the yellow accents won’t be for all. Knowing this, DROP recently released an all-black variant that looks very dapper – details below. Headset Quality
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Actual voice quality is also firmly good, not great. The mic doesn’t pick up bass tones well nor is it especially clear, but isn’t remotely tinny or muffled either, even with a pop filter installed. The mic did sound better, clearer and more immediate to my ears than the Master & Dynamics boom mic but not as clear as the Antlion ModMic. Unlike the ModMic, no pop filter is provided in the box and I did find this was an issue despite its in-built noise reduction. This would have been a cheap and functional addition; however, foam covers are cheaply available online for just a few dollars. Sound Overview

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The PC38X has been lauded for its strict adherence to the Harman headphone target. As a disclaimer, I would like to elucidate that this does not indicate perfect balance and timbre. The target is designed, in some capacity, to find what is universally appealing rather than technically correct. In addition, bass and treble roll-off is apparent, in turn, the headphone comes across as slightly n-shaped with a slight midrange focus. Despite this, the PC38X demonstrates a superbly linear and naturally voiced response. While it isn’t an engaging headphone nor technically outstanding by any means, this gives it a huge advantage over similarly affordable models – not to mention, excellent genre and use case versatility. The smoother top end isn’t ideal for highlighting directional cues, but it is suitable for reducing listening fatigue during long listening/gaming sessions, especially at higher volumes. If you are looking for an especially clean tonality and honest midrange voicing, the PC38X hangs with the best. Comparisons

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HD650/6XX ($220): At a $50 premium, the HD6XX has far more serious audiophile credentials, surely a richer pedigree for many. However, in listening you would be surprised to find the PC38X actually provides a more balanced tuning. The PC38X is tonally cleaner, clearer and more separated. It has a more open soundstage. From a cheap source, the PC38X is likely a better buy for most as it is far easier to drive. The HD6XX is a bit warmer and fuller sounding, but this also introduces some veil into its midrange that the PC38X lacks. The HD6XX has a more convincing treble response with a bit more presence and crispness. The main benefit is that the HD6XX has better driver quality throughout and is more nuanced overall. This is especially noticeable on complex tracks where the HD6XX rewards with more defined notes and less general smear. It is much more detailed in the treble and its bass is not only more textured and articulate, it also has a tighter, more assertive impact by a good degree. Using a tube amp with the HD6XX scales it up dramatically, you sacrifice a little resolution, but gain a much more balanced and euphonic signature and wider soundstage that resolves a lot of the veil I heard from SS sources. The PC38X doesn’t scale nearly as well but, of course, sounding better from cheaper sources, is the clear winner from a price/performance point of view. If you were looking for a long-term investment, the HD6XX can be considered as it scales more with better/expensive sources, opening up the avenue for future upgrades. Of course, you also have to factor in a mic into the price given it has no integrated solution. HE400i 2020 ($169): At the same price as the PC38X, Hifiman are providing an easy to drive planar design albeit with no mic. It is heavier and not as comfortable long term, but not an uncomfortable design in its own right. The HE400i is more difficult to drive, but not to the extent that a desktop stack is required. It will scale much better with a dedicated amplifier as well. Sonically, the HE400i pursues a similar kind of sound but isn’t quite as linear as the PC38X. The HE400i has a slightly more forward treble, giving it a crisper and more energetic sound. By comparison, its bass sounds slightly more laid-back. The PC38X provides a bit more mid-bass impact, the HE400i is slightly fuller in terms of voicing but also more controlled, retrieving more texture. The midrange is slightly more even on the PC38X though both have a natural voicing. The PC38X is slightly more accurate and coherent, it has a smoother articulation and slightly more body. The HE400i is slightly more revealing and articulate, it has higher resolution and resolves fine details better. The HE400i chiefly has a more present treble response. Though it isn’t a technical outlier, it is noticeably more resolving of fine detail than the PC38X which is further enhanced by its brighter tuning that brings treble more to the fore. The HE400i has better extension and air. Its soundstage is wider while the PC38X is a bit deeper. The HE400i has much clearer directional cues due to its brighter treble but arguably the PC38X has a more realistic portrayal of distance due to its more even tuning. Recommendation

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The PC38X appeals to two core audiences. Primarily, this is for the budget-conscious enthusiast wanting an all-purpose headphone for both music and gaming. Under these circumstances, this represents a terrific and well-realised option in basically all regards. Not only is its feature and accessory set convenient for gaming, even as an enthusiast with a wealth of gear, I found myself very pleased with the tonality for pure musical enjoyment. While the treble could do with a slight bump, impedance adaptors are a possible solution for those with a powerful enough source. Conversely, this may suit those with pricier audio-dedicated headphones wanting a cheaper gaming headset. Here, I think the purchase makes less sense as these users will be better off investing in a mod-mic; there is really no reason why high-end headphones cannot be used for gaming and many have a more vibrant, substantially more detailed treble which will aid the perception of direction in these use cases. Verdict The PC38X combines all-day comfort and integrated coms with a balanced and spacious sound from essentially any source. For those wanting a headphone for mixed uses, it is hard to deny the versatility and value provided by the PC38X.
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Would recommend to a friend.
gorlami
4
Nov 29, 2021
Fantastic review. How important would you say soundstage is for game immersion, especially single-player? If you had the choice between the 599, 560s, 58x, and pc38x for gaming, which would you select? for music?
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