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Fearlessleader
400
Jan 26, 2017
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Is the stated isolation in dB the NRR or some manufacturer's number? If not the official NRR, then what IS the NRR?
Jan 26, 2017
Peter2
4
Jan 28, 2017
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According to a popular website that has photos of this product, NRR is 5db...I'd be wary of that depending on what you want to use them for. Seems like they would be near worthless at concerts...
Of course we need MD to confirm the actual NRR in case these are different. You should contact support for a clearer answer.
Jan 28, 2017
Hualicopter
299
Jan 28, 2017
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NRR is a useless measure. NRR is the average of dB reductions across the spectrum, and you don't need high dB reductions across the spectrum, only in certain areas. For example, shooting plugs block out the low frequencies and often have low NRR because they attenuate very little at the high frequencies. You can flip the scenario around for musician plugs or any other specialty plug.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61h6VmCDK0S.pdf
Jan 28, 2017
Peter2
4
Jan 28, 2017
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Interesting read but that article you linked is a marketing piece written by the company that makes DUBS earplugs, so of course they will say it's OK to let huge low frequency sounds through - that's what their ear plugs do as well.
If you are at a concert with 110db in the low frequency range and are wearing these, you are still causing hearing loss. They only attenuate 1.2 db at 500hz!
When I go to concerts which I rarely do, I just use Hearos Extreme foam plugs. They generally have it cranked so loud I'm still hearing at 80+DB even with the plugs in.
Jan 28, 2017
Hualicopter
299
Jan 28, 2017
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It isn't a marketing ploy. It's cited straight from how NRR is calculated. You can look up how NRR is calculated, and they will tell you the same. If you want to waste money paying for more NRR, be my guest. I can tell you that at most shows, you have piercing highs at high dB, not bass.
Jan 28, 2017
Peter2
4
Jan 29, 2017
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And yet this fact still remains: 110 DB at any frequency is ruining your hearing. So is 100db. This has nothing to do with NRR. It is just a fact.
The article you linked doesn't say differently, and conveniently enough, doesn't say anything about safe listening levels. It takes an arbitrary decibel level and talks about attenuation below that range. If that range is 120db then these earplugs are not going to help you as OSHA standard say you can only be exposed to that level for 7.5 minutes. So yes, that article is marketing.
In the end, they are your ears and you only get one pair. These might be great for an office or quieter venue, but a full on concert....
Jan 29, 2017
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