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Selfish_Android
114
Mar 4, 2018
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I have a question, wearing this in concerts will improve the perceivable audio quality? usually in small metal gigs what you hear is a mess compared to the actual audio file, will a pair of good engineered earplugs fix or mitigate that issue?
Mar 4, 2018
w00m
178
Apr 23, 2018
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Short answer is, 'maybe'. Take them more for, 'you'll be able to hear in 10 years' factor than, 'hear concert better now' factor. I say this as the owner of a pair of customs I paid ~10x as much for that I use at concerts and on the road.
Apr 23, 2018
Selfish_Android
114
Apr 23, 2018
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Interesting, i might try buying some decent ones and see, never realized the potential or actual use of these things besides "blocking" noise which a cheapo bag of disposable earplugs would do just fine.
Apr 23, 2018
w00m
178
Apr 24, 2018
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Cheapo set of foam plugs will likely block significantly more sound, but I wouldn't want to block *all* sound while on the highway, just enough to avoid hearing damage while still being aware when a semi is coming up behind me. Similar with concert, will sound better than full-foam earplug, but 'improvement' over no plug would be fuzzy.
For frequency modulation, I can carry on a conversation on the highway with a passenger in my convertible with the top down if both of us have earplugs similar to this in, but not if we had no plugs in. I wouldn't drive with foam plugs in due to risk of not hearing a semi.
Apr 24, 2018
metis
142
Nov 5, 2018
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No. The reason you're hearing a mess is the local engineer or the local sound system isn't as good as a studio mix that has been listened to and re-worked until it's clear. I can't count the number of times I listened to a great show destroyed by a poorly tuned house audio rig or an an incompetent engineer.
Nov 5, 2018
Calaverasgrande
1393
Dec 5, 2018
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It's also a matter of sound pressure level. Especially for metal gigs, the sound level is often far and away higher in a small to medium club than at a huge arena show. This is because in a small room with solid concrete, brick or stone construction, bass frequencies will benefit from quarter space or eighth space reinforcement. Where at an arena show the subs are at best getting half space reinforcement. Also, in a modestly sized club the guitarist's full stack at moderate volume is absolutely flattening everyone. Not a lot of acoustic mass to excite in a 1500 sqft room! Once the guitar is up past 115db the drummer and bassist follow suit. The sound person can only do their best to amplify the vocals and lend some definition to the drums. Having been on both sides of this equation as a sound guy, drummer, bassist and guitarist. It really boils down to one thing. Turn down the guitar! Also; Do not mic the guitar at all unless you are recording.
Dec 5, 2018
metis
142
Dec 5, 2018
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As I said, the local house kid working for beer who thinks they know something isn't as good as a studio mix from a pro being paid enough that they're able to afford recording quality mics. If the house/stage rig is reasonably tuned and balanced to the room and you've got a useful FOH and/or monitor engineer, the guitarist's rig isn't a problem. The rig will get turned down to not nuke the room. If they don't like that the audience paid to hear the band and not just a stack sounding like crap, the guitar can certainly end up feeding back until the stack is turned down. Always mic (and or DI) the guitar - with a good rig I can keep the guitarists "sound" and get it to the audience more accurately than their single source. Metal seems to come in 2 flavors - complex, technically adept music with complex dynamic range that's as challenging to reinforce and record well, and loud poorly executed stuff that covers it's lack of chops with being more loud. If you don't grok gain structure really well, trying to mix metal is just a mess of "keep turning it up" until you can't tell it's bad.
Dec 5, 2018
Calaverasgrande
1393
Dec 5, 2018
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DI the guitar? I'm guessing you haven't done much metal.
Dec 5, 2018
metis
142
Dec 5, 2018
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A line out from the amp and/or in line before it. I guess you've never had a guitarist or bassist blow a cone on their stack, cook their amp, or both. It's a simple thing to shift to the line input with processing to emulate their rig (if needed). If you're lucky you have the room in their monitor to keep them happy. - It also allows you (with a BIG rig in a big venue) to let them get stupid loud and not have to worry about them clipping the mic signal, but still reinforce them. I had a metal group a few decades back who supplied 4 different guitar DI feeds because it let them do some $%^&*ing weird processor fades in the FOH mix. (They brought their own FOH guy). Drummer also had a bigger Gibraltar rack than I've ever seen, including in show rooms. They were a hoot. Simple loudness isn't an issue (although it can be). One of the best gigs I ever worked was over 112 dB at the FOH mix position about 40 yards from the stage, and it sounded outstanding. The stage topped 130 at points, I'm honestly not certain how the performers were still able to hear at all after the gig. I'm not sure what the FOH stacks were at, but I was sent up with aviation muffs on to try to figure out which box was failing, and I'm still not sure how to describe the feeling.
Dec 5, 2018
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