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14themoney
1110
Jan 14, 2020
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Made in collaboration with Moh Chi Nashitt Robotics, this Breacher Bar Set from HFT is the result of extensive research and input from tomb technicians, Sweat Shop prisoners, MALL ninjas, and parole officers who regularly need to crack things open. Ideal for opening cardboard crates, car windows, and punching through soft metal objects (tin foil wrapping, soda cans), the Breacher Bar Set comes with a small and large pry bar for different scenarios and different sized hands. Get yours today for $4.99 before tax.
Jan 14, 2020
reswright
1677
Feb 19, 2020
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I, too, think I'd just use a crowbar. Same price, better leverage, more useful in the round. I don't carry one around with me, but I can't say I'd be tempted to carry these around with me either. Most places I need to open a crate, tools are at hand already. These things might be fine, I just don't really see a use case for them that a crowbar doesn't already fit a little bit better. For everyone else: anything you see with a cage code that isn't reported as government surplus, someone made it for the military or government and they decided not to buy it, which is something to pay a little attention to -- surplus means they did decide to buy it but never had to use it, not surplus may mean they didn't want to buy it. I am a huge fan of working with gov surplus stuff because it's usually rugged and decently well made, if not stylish, but sometimes there's a big stock of them left over because they made extra, sometimes it's because the gov might have refused a shipment or cancelled the contract, lots of different possibilities, and sometimes the possibilities suck. So word to the wise -- if you see it's got a cage code but isn't marked as official US surplus, do make sure you do your due diligence on the item before you buy it. These days they try and sell the gov some serious bullshit, fam. Maybe this is a better way to say it: some things they make for soliders because soldiers live rugged lives and need rugged gear to survive. Other things they make for soldiers because you gotta give people a direct order before they'll use them :)
(Edited)
Feb 19, 2020
MadStork
12
Feb 23, 2020
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It has a CAGE code which signifies EOD Robotics as a government vendor but it doesn't have a National Stock Number (NSN). I'm not sure if that means this has no corresponding Mil-Spec or if it wasn't produced for the military. There could be some other explanations as well but in my experience with the military everything had a NSN.
(Edited)
Feb 23, 2020
reswright
1677
Feb 23, 2020
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these days they make a metric shit ton of stuff for DHS components, and I can easily see breacher bars being produced for ICE or CBP, so that might be the provenance of these items.
Feb 23, 2020
MadStork
12
Feb 23, 2020
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Could be. Maybe also Federal Fire Departments? Sadly my experience with the DOD stock system was limited to hazmat in Pharmacies/Hazmincens/Hazmarts, so by no means am I an expert.
Feb 23, 2020
reswright
1677
Feb 23, 2020
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Nor am I. On the other hand, if EOD holds a supply schedule, they can sell through it to any state, local or muni government that fills out a couple forms, so could be a lotta things.
Feb 23, 2020
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