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Showing 1 of 10 conversations about:
djozz
16
Jan 16, 2019
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Beware. I have this light, as quite a few others from the BLF forum, and many found that the 219D led used in this light can not handle the current that this flashlight runs at. At lower modes the light is pleasantly warm, but the led turns angry blue at the maximum setting , which indicates that it is overdriven and will not survive long. Otherwise this is a very nice flashlight and really compact. The e-switch at the rear is a pleasure to operate. The grooves and edges on the body are pretty sharp but that is a matter of taste. Because that is what I do with my lights, I changed the led to a Samsung LH351D 4000K 90CRI which handles high current much better, and now it is a very nice cycling light in the holder on my handlebar.
Jan 16, 2019
henryj3223
0
Jan 18, 2019
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For $22 I would definitely expect issues of that stripe
Jan 18, 2019
jayonnaise
114
Jan 18, 2019
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How difficult is that swap to perform?
Jan 18, 2019
djozz
16
Jan 18, 2019
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A swap is not obvious. The construction of the head is different from normal: the ledboard is sitting over a hole, on the back of the ledboard a pillar is soldered (a thick piece of FRP-board with a couple of via's) that is sticking through the hole and makes directly contact with the +pole of the battery. So the core of the board is +, the flashlight body is minus controlled by the driver in the rear of the flashlight. So under the board all that separates batt+ from driver- is a layer of anodisation. This is less bad than it sounds because there still is a driver between batt- and body, in case of a short that will probably burn out instead of blowing the battery. Concerning the led-swap, you either have to unsolder the pillar, then swap the led, then resolder it (that is how I did it, on a hotplate), or easier is using a hot air device from above.
(Edited)
Jan 18, 2019
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