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HandOfJake
15
Mar 10, 2017
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Calling a moka-pot an espresso maker is stretching the truth by quite a considerable margin. At the most you could say it can produce an intense coffee somewhat similar to that of espresso. I don't have an espresso machine so the moka-pot is my go-to if I feel like having coffee that's full flavored and intense in a way that I can't get from either my plunger or aeropress. Making a decent moka-pot is quite straight forward, it's kind of hard to mess it up once you know the basics to be honest. -Grind size should be somewhere between a drip filter and and espresso grind, too fine and you'll end up triggering the pressure release valve and or things will taste bitter and over-extracted. -You want to fill the filter section so that it's just below level with ground coffee, If you weigh it out (there's no point really) it's about 26grams. Sometimes I find it's easiest to use a finger to carefully level off the grinds. -Fill the bottom chamber with water just below the safety valve. I use boiling water to speed things up some people say you should use cold water, personally I haven't noticed a difference in flavor. -Place it on the stove at a a medium low heat, too high and the coffee will come out tasting burnt. Ideally you want a slow steady stream once the coffee starts flowing. As the top chamber starts to fill up be ready to take the pot off the heat when it starts to foam and gurgle at the end of the extraction.
Mar 10, 2017
A community member
Mar 13, 2017
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If you fill it with boiling water, doesn't it get too hot to hold while you're attaching the upper section?
Mar 13, 2017
HandOfJake
15
Mar 14, 2017
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Unfortunately yes but you can get away with if you're quick to fill and put the top section on. Usually tho I just grab the nearest dish cloth.
Mar 14, 2017
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