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SiegeX
11
Aug 17, 2016
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@ilickspam the name of the game for subs is "bass extension", i.e. what is the lowest frequency the sub can reproduce before it peters out. The cheaper subs, such as this one, quit fairly high up in the mid 40Hz(* see note). If you want a sub for PC games this one seems like a fine choice for the money. If, however, you want a sub with similar aesthetics that will rattle your bones (and house) in the low 20Hz for movies then you're looking at something like the SVS SB-1000 in white but you're going to pay $500 for it. http://www.svsound.com/products/sb-1000 The other benefit of lower base extension is that your brain cannot perceive the location source of low frequency waves. So with a sub that goes only into the 40's you will be able to pinpoint where the bass is coming from much more than a sub producing bass in the low 20's, the former leading to a loss of immersion.
*NOTE: Even though the specs say it goes down to 35Hz, that is with a +/- 6dB threshold; the spec you really want is the 3dB threshold as that is where the power is half of the steady state. Companies release 6dB (or higher) specs to make their product look better and hope you don't realize you're not actually doing a proper apples to apples comparison with a sub that gives you its low bass extension as the 3dB point. I'm assuming this sub's 3dB point is in the mid 40's but it could even be in the low 50's. Without a frequency vs power chart it's impossible to know for sure but it's probably close.
Aug 17, 2016
ilickspam
2
Aug 17, 2016
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Thanks for the information!
Aug 17, 2016
pizzamuncher88
88
Aug 18, 2016
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The source becomes directionally locatable when the wavelength is short enough that it arrives at the eardrums at two points in time far enough apart that the brain can triangulate the source direction. That's roughly 100Hz for the average person. But subs often will have significant harmonic output, which will extend well into the directional frequencies. Lowering the crossover point helps minimize those harmonics, and the directional information they provide. my point is, a more expensive sub won't necessarily be less directional just because it extends lower. ^_______^
Aug 18, 2016
SiegeX
11
Aug 23, 2016
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All very true. Technically you are 100% correct. Practically speaking what makes a sub more expensive is both its low end extension as well as its frequency response (possibly with built-in active filtering). Although intrinsic freq response is meaningless unless you run decent soundEq with dozens if not hundreds of filter points (either onboard AVR or inline) and at least 6 points of measurements as most people do not have a sub in either the ideal spot nor ideal room (myself included).
Aug 23, 2016
sdfx
108
Dec 16, 2016
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In regards to lowering the crossover point, I've read that for most sub setups that this tends to hinge around 80Hz.. Should I keep the crossover point there, or should I lower it to a number less than 80Hz?
Dec 16, 2016
pizzamuncher88
88
Jan 9, 2017
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totally depends on what speakers you are using the sub with. you kinda want the sub to pick up where the speakers leave off (frequency-wise) so if your speakers roll off around 70hz you want your crossover of the sub to be around that area (play around and find the cutoff that gives the fullest sound at your listening position, if it sounds good, it is good)
Jan 9, 2017
sdfx
108
Jan 9, 2017
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This is great advice thanks! I have the Kanto YUMI's for reference. I'll take a look at the reported freq. roll off.
Jan 9, 2017
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