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JGalt
61
Feb 9, 2017
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Anyone know of a reasonably priced sub that has a frequency response of 20Hz to at least 110Hz AND has Line level L and R full range (pre crossover) outputs? I am thinking of sending source audio to the sub, then taking the line level outputs into my amp which then feeds my right and left speakers completing a 2.1 stereo system that way ... Both my solid state and tube amplifiers do not have a Sub Out and my music library (source) is coming out of my iTunes library on a MacBook Pro. THANKS!
Feb 9, 2017
pewpewmcpanda
29
Feb 10, 2017
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Are your left/right speakers passive or active speakers? You might be able to use the BIC F12 speaker line pass throughs for this type of set up. The BIC F12 is pretty large though. Here's the Zeos review for consideration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=id9UNYpgTdY
Feb 10, 2017
stoopid3
37
Feb 10, 2017
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20hz is a very low number to achieve. A few subs in the affordable category produce low end starting in the upper 20s, most start in the 30s.
Feb 10, 2017
JGalt
61
Feb 10, 2017
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True. I have a M&K 12" sub in my Dolby Atmos home theater which I LOVE but I'm looking for something less expensive for my 2.1 room. The M&K specs out down there and it's great for movies AND music. Makes me want to make sure whatever I get for my 2.1 room can compare.
Feb 10, 2017
stoopid3
37
Feb 10, 2017
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If size isn't an issue, perhaps this?:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16882290130
This is my primary in the living room. It's spectacular given the low price.
Feb 10, 2017
DanielJS
15
Feb 11, 2017
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110hz? That seems awfully high for a crossover point. I've been sporting a Dayton 10 from parts Express that has speaker level in.
Feb 11, 2017
JGalt
61
Feb 11, 2017
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That's the High Pass point ... off-loading everything below that to the sub allows the 2-way R and L speakers to more efficiently, and sonically better, handle 110Hz - 20KHz +. The Sub then is only "responding" to frequencies below 110Hz (the sub isn't fed anything above 110Hz and the R and L 2-ways are fed anything below 110Hz) ... also these crossovers aren't brick walls, there is an engineered "leak" of about 10Hz in both directions meaning at slightly lower levels some frequencies below 110Hz are fed to the R and L 2-ways and some frequencies above 110Hz are fed to the Sub.
Feb 11, 2017
DanielJS
15
Feb 11, 2017
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The problem with crossing over at that high is that the location of the sub becomes detectable.
Feb 11, 2017
JGalt
61
Feb 11, 2017
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You are exactly right. I have indeed found that placement of the sub becomes more detectable. Fortunately my 2.1 room is a dedicated listening space and I can place the sub anywhere I like ... or more appropriate put: wherever the sub needs to be to sound best. I'm also fortunate that in my Dolby Atmos home theater the sub is dead center under the screen facing the sweet spot which is three seats wide and the far left and far right fourth and fifth seats aren't suffering too much as movie LFE are less critical Than music although I must say that even when listening to music it's not bad either!
Feb 11, 2017
kenwstr
91
Mar 29, 2017
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The usual advice I get is to use the sub for the lowest octave or octave and a half. So if you really need a 110 Hz cross over from mains to sub, you need to be looking at subs with a minimum roll off in the 40-55 Hz range. If 110 Hz is the limit of your main stereo pair, they are not in the performance range required for a system that goes down to 20 Hz. The reality is that very little music goes to 20 Hz though movie effects can do. So if you wish to continue building a system based on a 110 Hz cross over frequency, then a 40 Hz sub would be a very good match for it. Seriously, the biggest limiting factor is simply space. If the room has space and you don't mind more prominent speakers, then you can go for sealed main cabinets because these make the least compromises in sound quality but they are big (floor standing cabinets). If space is an issue, you will have to go for ported main cabinets to achieve the desired bass extension from smaller cabinets at some acoustic compromise. Just remember that all other things being equal, the smaller the main cabinets, the more limited the bass extension will be. If you want a system to go to 20 Hz, ideally you need the main stereo pair to go as low as 40-55 Hz and a sub from there to 20 Hz.
Ps, the best value for money is in 2nd hand, very high end speakers from the 80s-90s but they have to be in very good condition and may well require replacing some parts. It the cones and surrounds are undamaged and there are no air leaks, it's a good sign.
Ken
Mar 29, 2017
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