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K.T.N
1246
Jun 4, 2015
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Which style of blade is more useful for everyday use, i.e cutting paper, cardboard, fabrics, string, cords, cheeses, sausages, other foods, etc.?
The tanto blade seems more suited to jabbing or stabbing. Not sure how the flat cutting edge of the tanto compares to the curved blade for everyday tasks.
Which to get?
Jun 4, 2015
dealaholic
299
Jun 5, 2015
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I have both and usually I prefer the NON-Tanto blade but for some reason the curve on the CQC-6 is too aggressive taking much more effort of having the angle the blade in an awkward position to do the everyday tasks you've mentioned above. Also, the CQC-7 came much sharper, perhaps also due to the blade geometry. So, in this case the 7 gets much more use and the 6 sits around. Hope this is helpful.
Jun 5, 2015
vrillusions
55
Jun 24, 2015
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I'll prefix this with I'm not a blade expert but I play one on the internet...
This is based on the knives I have (Leek, Chive, Drone 1960, Kuro 1835tblkst (partial seration)) with the Kuro being my current EDC.
For most EDC sort of tasks you want a cutting blade, not a piercing one. A prime example of a piercing knife is the leek. It has a very thin point so you can pierce stuff real easy. Leek is also good for precision and works a lot like an oversized xacto knife.
For cutting you want something want the body of the blade (the width) to be big. Think meat cleaver vs steak knife. The more weight behind the blade the more momentum you have to cut things. In my collection this is shown in the drone.
Tanto points are supposed to be a best of both worlds. It can pierce and since you push in with the whole blade it has a lot of momentum behind it. They're also wide so they have good momentum in a cutting action. One of it's drawbacks is it can be difficult to sharpen because you have to sharpen two edges instead of just one. Also that point where the two edges meet can become rounded. Usually both but 99% of the time the front edge is completely flat which makes sharpening each edge easier and the flat edge is good if you need to make a straight cut an inch or less in length
For reference the reason I carry the Kuro around. First I can carry it tip up (the same as these operate), then the blade is partially serrated which rips through rope and such like nothing, and the Tanto point I find the most utilitarian. Also like these it was cheap. I can use it and not be worried about breaking a $500 knife. If it breaks or I lose it or something oh well I'm out $20 or $30. Hope that helps
(edit) fixed to say tip up not tip down as I always gets those confused. The direction is where the tip of the blade is pointing when it's in your pocket, not when the blade is extended
Jun 24, 2015
overground
44
Jun 24, 2015
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"First I can carry it tip down (the same as these operate)" I believe these are only tip up carry.
Jun 24, 2015
vrillusions
55
Jun 30, 2015
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yeah you're right, I always get the two confused
Jun 30, 2015
Tasselhoff
514
Jul 2, 2015
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They are "Tip-Up" carry because that's the only way the Emerson Mechanic works ie: if it was upside down then the hook is useless for the purpose it was designed for... catching on the corner of your pocket to open the knife.
Jul 2, 2015
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