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JulianW
1
Jan 28, 2015
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Being a knife with a spring this makes it illegal in quite a lot of countries. Many laws have been updated to outlaw all knives that operate with any kind of spring. This includes "Assisted-Opening". I just checked with Swiss customs. I'm guessing this is pretty much the same everywhere in the EU, too. So bummer, no deal for me.
Jan 28, 2015
thesawta
23
Jan 28, 2015
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I can't speak for every country and their laws, but by technicality, this blade uses SpeedSafe, which according to this site (http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/technology) meaning it uses a torsion bar, not a torsion spring. This is important distinction because the bar creates tension on the blade *against* opening, instead of assisting in opening the way a switchblade would.
They do have a specific part on that page where they talk about legalities though:
"Is a SpeedSafe knife a switchblade? No, SpeedSafe knives are not switchblades. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead, the user must overcome the torsion bar's resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade. However, due to the complexity and constantly changing nature of these laws and regulations, it is impossible for Kershaw Knives to be aware of every restriction in every location in which our knives are sold or carried. It is the responsibility of the buyer to investigate and comply with the laws and regulations that apply in his or her specific area."
Sad to hear the law might be working against you in this case. :(
Jan 28, 2015
thesawta
23
Jan 28, 2015
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I can't speak for every country and their laws, but by technicality, this blade uses SpeedSafe, which according to this site (http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/technology) meaning it uses a torsion bar, not a torsion spring. This is important distinction because the bar creates tension on the blade *against* opening, instead of assisting in opening the way a switchblade would.
They do have a specific part on that page where they talk about legalities though:
"Is a SpeedSafe knife a switchblade? No, SpeedSafe knives are not switchblades. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead, the user must overcome the torsion bar's resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade. However, due to the complexity and constantly changing nature of these laws and regulations, it is impossible for Kershaw Knives to be aware of every restriction in every location in which our knives are sold or carried. It is the responsibility of the buyer to investigate and comply with the laws and regulations that apply in his or her specific area."
Sad to hear the law might be working against you in this case. :(
Jan 28, 2015
thesawta
23
Jan 28, 2015
bookmark_border
I can't speak for every country and their laws, but by technicality, this blade uses SpeedSafe, which according to this site (http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/technology) meaning it uses a torsion bar, not a torsion spring. This is important distinction because the bar creates tension on the blade *against* opening, instead of assisting in opening the way a switchblade would.
They do have a specific part on that page where they talk about legalities though:
"Is a SpeedSafe knife a switchblade? No, SpeedSafe knives are not switchblades. There are many unique features of SpeedSafe knives that make them quite different than knives that are considered switchblades. Unlike a switchblade, SpeedSafe blades DO NOT deploy with the push of a button in the handle or by gravity alone. Instead, the user must overcome the torsion bar's resistance in order to engage the SpeedSafe system. Because of this, SpeedSafe knives fall fully outside the Federal definition of a switchblade. However, due to the complexity and constantly changing nature of these laws and regulations, it is impossible for Kershaw Knives to be aware of every restriction in every location in which our knives are sold or carried. It is the responsibility of the buyer to investigate and comply with the laws and regulations that apply in his or her specific area."
Sad to hear the law might be working against you in this case. :(
Jan 28, 2015
warriorscot
317
Jan 29, 2015
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Nope not an EU covered issue, and its spring close not assisted. Although the Swiss would do it different anyway unless they joined the EU and didn't tell the rest of us.
Jan 29, 2015
kottik
22
Jan 29, 2015
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I opened a poll for those, head up to EDC and vote for your favorite
Jan 29, 2015
Mistergrave
1
Feb 1, 2015
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In Belgium and The Netherlands it is in fact legal...
Feb 1, 2015
billyboblewis
2
Feb 11, 2015
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Kershaws with speedsafe are considered assisted opening knives. This should not really concern anyone unless they are considering a life of crime and expect to be searched on a regular basis. Even then police rarely check to see the opening mechanism of a knife. I have been stopped once by state troopers who questioned me about the knife examined it and then just let it drop to the bottom of my pocket. I have been carrying knives since I was 7 about 60 years ago and the opening has never been a probblem for me. I dont bring knives to the airport, the one time I did I gave it away to someone arriving who actually was more suspicious than a cop.
Feb 11, 2015
bhaigh
31
Feb 12, 2015
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Ya think? If I arrived at an airport and some guy flying out handed me a knife I would be pretty scared to take it. "Who did he just stab and handing it off to me" - made me chuckle.
And you are right about the legality of these knives, but that goes for almost anything, you could carry a handgun around all day and unless you are flashing it around no person or police will ever bother with you.
But, If they are looking for a reason........
Feb 12, 2015
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