Showing 1 of 66 conversations about:
TigerUK
207
Feb 14, 2017
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first world problems. hammock isn't comfortable enough, lets put an airbed in it.
Feb 14, 2017
CheapBastard
116
Feb 14, 2017
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I get the joke, but for those who have not yet experienced camping in a hammock, this is a necessary thing. I started maybe 15 years ago, after some seriously hard-core treehangers convinced me. First thing they said? Insulate the &#%&!!! out of the bottom. There is constant airflow under a hammock, which means you can't trap air for insulation. The model I have from Clark Jungle Hammocks has pockets with elastic closure, so I put clothes in some, and inflate plastic grocery bags for others. This helps increase temps about 7-10 degrees, which is significant.
A couple of weeks ago, I used a fleece bag sack (goes over the sleeping bag), and was able to sleep in -4C temps - there was ice on the outside of the hammock.
Then there's the issue of sag. Some newer camping hammocks are made to lay crosswise, but not all. Laying at an angle (Brazilian hammocks are made this way) keeps you more even. In a top-slung or gathered hammock, you're sleeping in the bottom of a bowl. Pads help minimize this, make it easier for back sleepers. The curve can hyperextend your knees and doesn't let you back relax properly.
Finally, a traditional pad in a gathered hammock won't keep the sides from closing in on you - you feel like a mummy at times, especially with insulating clothes, heavy bags, and perhaps an underquilt. The wings on this should help stabilize the sides AND provide insulation there. Again, if you make direct contact with the hammock material without insulation, you're just making a heat conduction path that will sap warmth from you quickly.
Yeah, your joke made me chuckle, but I saw an opportunity to 'splain a bit why this is such a cool design. I can get two days of fully contained (carrying all water and food) camping out of a 45lb daypack with a hammock instead of a tent.
Feb 14, 2017
EmbracetheBrutality
32
Feb 14, 2017
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Sure you can be in a hammock without a sleeping bag in the middle of winter, its just not comfortable enough.
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Feb 14, 2017
TigerUK
207
Feb 14, 2017
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the point of the outdoors is it's not meant to be comfortable. This reminds me of westerners who go to climb mount everest and hire 5 sepoys who follow behind them carrying all their gear. LOL.
Feb 14, 2017
CheapBastard
116
Feb 14, 2017
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The point of the outdoors is to be experienced and enjoyed, and that means different things to different people. I typically backpack for 1-2 nights solo, usually in fall and early spring while others are indoors. In my area, that also means there is generally no water and frequently fire restrictions. I like the solitude, but I'd also like to get home to my wife and child. It's not just comfort, but survival.
Sure, some people take a heli to the tops of mountains because the can't or don't want to climb. Some people only go underwater with attached breathing lines. Other people think camping involves an RV with satellite hookups. So what? Are they not allowed to enjoy those pieces of nature unless they suffer?
So long as people are respectful of others and don't damage the environment, who cares how they participate? Even the lumber-jack looking hipster who's only experienced a tree in Central Park or the Nature channel could become an advocate, simply by being able to access these things on their (nondestructive) terms.
Feb 14, 2017
Epicfacethe3rd
27
Feb 15, 2017
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As a boy scout and a backpacker, I beg to differ. the point of the outdoors is to enjoy it, possibly alongside your friends. how you camp is a direct statement of what is comfortable and enjoyable for you. People sleep in tents to be close to nature. People backpack so they can have nature embrace them, and so they can see more of it. Ultralighters go light because they feel that more weight keeps their mind away from the world around them. RV and car campers go heavy because they like all the comforts of home. Hammock users need pads and underquilt to keep them warm. I personally don't hammock - I feel that the extra weight required compared to tarp tenting is redundant, and I like to sleep on the ground - but I know that they do it because it's fun, and it brings them to nature. Is someone who has lived in the city all his life who decides to go out to a state park to camp out of his car for a weekend "not getting the point" because he is unsure about camping? the reality is that at the end of the day, the point of the outdoors is to have fun, and push yourself beyond your boundaries. Not to be uncomfortable, and possibly risk your safety because you "need to be uncomfortable"
Feb 15, 2017
BlackElk
65
Feb 18, 2017
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I totally get it. When your covering 10-15 miles a day at altitude and you have days or weeks left before you get out of the wilderness inevitably you suffer. The gear helps with taking a bit of the edge off. The most spectacular places I have seen have required a tremendous effort to get to, were physically demanding, and part of the cost of admission was to "suffer". The experience is very subjective.
Feb 18, 2017
Tommyadams
13
Feb 21, 2017
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Dude. Come on.
When hammock camping it's either a pad or an underquilt. This is one option.
Feb 21, 2017
Scotty84
5
Apr 21, 2017
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Try sleeping in one in the cold without insulation on the bottom and i think you will find that an insulated pad is necessary also this pad Has Wings because the hammock will squeeze up to the side of your shoulders and you will get no insulation with a normal flat pad and end up very cold and uncomfortable
Apr 21, 2017
DrThrob
156
Apr 22, 2017
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This versus an underquilt, which would you prefer? I have lain with a partially deflated klymit pad before in a hammock and it shifted everywhere so I am hesitant about this one.
Apr 22, 2017
CheapBastard
116
Apr 22, 2017
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I prefer an air mattress because it provides more support (and I can tolerate a bit colder weather than most). The underquilt is likely to be warmer, but won't provide any support because it's just meant as insulation underneath the hammock. I agree that it's important to keep fully inflated and in place. My sleeping bag is a Big Agnes that has zero insulation on the bottom - instead, it has a sleeve for a pad so nothing shifts. the Klymit won't fit in the sleeve, but I've tried it out in the back yard for an hour or so, and the wings coupled with the no-slip grip keep things really well in position.
Apr 22, 2017
DrThrob
156
Apr 22, 2017
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Are you a side sleeper or a back sleeper? I think pads are probably better for back sleepers.
Apr 22, 2017
Happily-Me
38
Aug 20, 2017
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Finally someone who's reasonable!!! lol
Aug 20, 2017
CheapBastard
116
Oct 30, 2017
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I'm a side sleeper, which has presented difficulties with hammock camping. However, I got to spend a handful of nights with this recently (in a new Clark hammock), and was able to sleep on my side pretty well. I did find the hole between the wings a couple of times, which woke me up, but then I had chosen to skip using my sleeping bag and instead used a pair of fleece blankets instead. It got down to about 50F, and I had no other problems.
I will say it's a challenge to get into the Clark with one of these in place. It's wide enough that you have to *make* it go down into the sack of the hammock, and hold it in place while climbing in. Once you get there, it's almost like it's sewn in place, though. The insulated version is actually a bit too warm during the day.
Oct 30, 2017
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