Showing 1 of 117 conversations about:
Mbot
196
Jan 17, 2018
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This TV is last year's model. I wouldn't touch it with a ten mile pole. And something has never looked quite right with an OLED picture!
OLEDs are not very bright, and they have screen burn-in/ghosting issues. That's why this model is half price, and it also doesn't have HDMI 2.1
The new 2018 Samsung QLEDs are actually better in every aspect than the LG OLED. The Samsung QLED has VRR for variable fps-sync with the Xbox One X console / HDMI 2.1 / A new full-array backlight panel / 100% Adobe color spectrum / Super-fast latency / All HDR formats / Professional 2000 nits brightness (the OLED can only reach 150 nits in non-hdr mode.
The 2017 Samsung QLED already had better blacks than all other LED TVs, but now the 2018 QLED has been re-engineered for superior black levels, to the point where 99% of viewers will see it as better than OLED! How can I say that you might ask? The following comments are from an panel of experts who were personally invited by Samsung to review the new 2018 model in a closed session...
"One of the other TVs suffered less with backlight-clouding, striping and blooming than any other LCD TV I’ve ever seen, including Sony’s outstanding Z9D, but Samsung was so confident about the accuracy of its backlight controls in the new QLED Q9F replacement that it was prepared to use one of the toughest shots currently found on 4K Blu-ray to date to show off what it was capable of. That shot is the one in La La Land where Sebastian plays the piano illuminated against a near black backdrop by a single bright, bluish spotlight. And pretty incredibly, the demo unit of Samsung’s upcoming QLED 4K flagship managed to deliver this shot while exhibiting practically zero backlight clouding or haloing around the spot-lit area. Even though the intensity and brightness of that area looked actually slightly more extreme than it did on even the OLED TV.
And it was clear to all of us watching the demonstration that the new QLED model WAS DELIVERING BOTH THE BEST CONTRAST AND BEST LIGHT UNIFORMITY OF ALL THE SCREENS ON SHOW, of which one was LG's OLED TV. The 2017 QLED looked comfortably the worst with the La La Land scene, with grey bleaching of the black area running right across the scree and pretty much from top to bottom. The older QLED only came in third in this hugely difficult scene (though it improved massively with most of the other brighter footage shown during the demo), with the OLED coming second. Even the OLED, though, sometimes looked slightly greyer in the blackness around the spot-lit area than Samsung’s new OLED. So exceptionally well-controlled was the new QLED acklighting in this extreme shot - even when Samsung turned the lights off in the demo room - that it seems clear we’re not looking at just the results of direct lighting with plenty of dimming zones. Samsung’s new panel structure and processing is at work.
The new panel structure introduces a ‘black layer’ that essentially places tiny barriers between each liquid-crystal to ensure the light from each pixel goes directly forward rather than leaking into the ‘beams’ of neighboring pixels. Also Samsung’s latest processing engine, with its ability to finely analyze the lighting in the image and gently fade the light of each lighting zone towards its outer edges when required, also seems to be a pretty remarkable evolution in LCD backlighting, especially as it seems to work while delivering no evidence of the backlight ‘blockiness’ witnessed with previous LCD backlight innovations such as Sony’s Slim Backlight Drive and Panasonic’s ‘Honeycomb’ panel structure. I was seriously impressed, too, by how the exceptionally deep and uniform black levels which the 2018 QLED was capable of reproducing still contained plenty of subtle colour and greyscale details. It’s certainly not the case that the screen is just completely shutting off its backlights in the darkest zones to deliver absolute-but-hollow blackness.
Shifting tack, Samsung also ran part of the 4K HDR red crab sequence in Planet Earth II. This is a far brighter scene than the La La Land one, and more predictably the new Samsung QLED again looked the best of the four screens on show - by some margin. The colors of the crabs looked more dynamic but also more natural. The streams of sunlight through the trees looked punchier but also more full of subtle light and color detail. The balance of light and shade looked more consistently authentic and ‘right’. Peak details such as sunlight reflecting off the crabs’ bodies looked more dynamic. And also, more unexpectedly, the QLED picture looked more detailed and crisp than that of the other screens without it looking forced or processed.
Another section of the demonstration of Samsung’s latest QLED included a detailed and again convincing demonstration of how its combination of improved Quantum Dots (Samsung has made the red and green QD’s smaller to deliver a purer, wider color range that now covers 100% of the DCI P3 cinematic color space) and high brightness appear to deliver colors with more accurate volumes than one of 2017’s OLED TVs. To round the picture demonstration off, we were also shown the HDR10+ dynamic metadata system the latest QLED TVs will support. Clips of a variety of bright, detailed HDR shots of mostly nature scenes, full of rocks, trees and clouds, clearly revealed more refinement in the image’s colors; a generally more dynamic, three-dimensional look to the picture; and finally, clearly more detail in the very brightest parts of the image. We’re not done with the good stuff yet though. It also became clear during the demonstration of the new QLED 4K flagship’s black-level abilities that the latest screen seems to be delivering on a key undelivered promise of 2017’s QLED models by supporting a much wider viewing-angle than you usually get with LCD TVs. I’d say I got as much as 60 degrees off axis before I started to notice any contrast or color reduction. If this holds true with the finished, launched 2018 TVs, it would qualify as a superb result - presumably delivered by the new near-surface prismatic lens layer the latest QLED screens use to disperse the  emerging images over a wider area (to compensate for having previously channeled the light with more focus via the new light-channeling barriers). Finally on the picture front, it was extremely clear - especially versus the Sony ZD9 and OLED models - that the new improved anti-reflection filter in the upcoming QLED is doing an even better job than last year’s QLEDS of boosting contrast and black level by limiting onscreen reflections. And that’s really saying something." The 2018 QLED models are the best TVs in the world!
Jan 17, 2018
Games_Spence
12
Jan 17, 2018
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You'll be disappointed with viewing angles and with contrast on your samsung for sure. In SDR tv's don't tend to show off their brightness wise guy. AND finally Samsungs advertised brightness tends to not show in real world content because of the dimming limitations of LED televisions. Their tvs are overpriced for a step down in quality at this point. That may well change when they bring their micro LED to the consumer line in a few years.
Jan 17, 2018
steve.v
166
Jan 17, 2018
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I have this tv, set to halfway, it's already very bright; I have to turn the oled to 20 (out of 100). But then again, it's subjective to the room it's setup in. Brightness isn't even a concern; it's a feature.
The Samsung Qled is a very nice quality alternative. But the pixel localization of oled and deep black levels won me over. Basically, oled will always have a better picture quality.
What concerns me is burn in and image retention; I do not see any; hopefully never. I do heavy gaming on it.
Oh and if anyone plans to get this, I recommend the 65 inch version. 55 is too small imo.
Jan 17, 2018
Rk12345
5
Jan 17, 2018
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QLED works better if you are watching in a brighter room. The key difference between Q/OLED is how they achieve contrast. in OLED, the individual pixels on/off, allowing the set to achieve a true black. QLED is similar to current LCD screens in that instead of pixels turning off and on, a filter is used to block the light emitted by a particular pixel when it needs black. Instead, QLED has a higher brightness intensity, so it achieves contrast by increasing the higher end of the color spectrum. Because of that, QLED works better in brighter environmenta, while OLED will give you a better picture, but ideally is enjoyed in a darker setting.
Jan 17, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 18, 2018
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You're misinformed - wiseguy.
Samsung was well-aware of minor shortcomings in the 1st QLED series (2017), but they have fixed all those issues in the 2018 model. Viewing angles are now faultless, and sdr brightness is much higher on a QLED than an OLED. And dimming limitations are due to edge-lit screens (which the 2017 models were) but the 2018 QLED models now use full-array backlighting panels, and don't forget that QLED TVs use quantum Dots, far superior to regular LED.
There are well-known benefits of LED screens over OLED, but the Samsung QLED is not only matching the OLED strengths, but is also outclassing it with the strengths of LED😁
LG claims 1000 nits brightness, but that is a false number, it's only in HDR mode, and only under rare circumstances, its true brightness is 150 nits, whereas the true brightness of a QLED is 5x that.
Jan 18, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 18, 2018
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The 2017 Samsung QLED already had better blacks than all other LED TVs, but now the 2018 QLED panel has been modified and re-engineered for superior black levels, to the point where 99% of viewers will see it as better than OLED! How can I say that you might ask? The following comments are from an exclusive panel of experts who were personally invited by Samsung to review the new 2018 model in a closed session...
"Because one of the other TVs suffered less with backlight-clouding, striping and blooming than any other LCD TV I’ve ever seen. Including Sony’s outstanding Z9D, but Samsung was so confident about the accuracy of its backlight controls in the new QLED Q9F replacement that it was prepared to use one of the toughest shots currently found on 4K Blu-ray to date to show off what it was capable of. That shot is the one in La La Land where Sebastian plays the piano illuminated against a near black backdrop by a single bright, bluish spotlight. And pretty incredibly, the demo unit of Samsung’s upcoming QLED 4K flagship managed to deliver this shot while exhibiting practically zero backlight clouding or haloing around the spot-lit area. Even though the intensity and brightness of that area looked actually slightly more extreme than it did on even the OLED TV below. Yep, that’s right: Samsung’s chutzpah even extended to running this early version of its Q9F replacement against a 2017 model.
And it was clear to all of us watching the demonstration in the ‘secret’ part of Samsung’s stand that the new QLED model WAS DELIVERING BOTH THE BEST CONTRAST AND BEST LIGHT UNIFORMITY OF ALL THE SCREENS ON SHOW, of which one was LG's OLED TV. The 2017 Q9F looked comfortably the worst with the La La Land scene, with grey bleaching of the black area running right across the screen, and pretty much from top to bottom. The Z9D only came in third in this hugely difficult scene (though it improved massively with most of the other, brighter footage shown during the demo), with the OLED second. Even the OLED, though, sometimes looked slightly greyer in the blackness around the spot-lit area than Samsung’s new QLED. So exceptionally well-controlled was the new QLED TV’s backlighting in this extreme shot - even when Samsung turned the lights in the demo room off - that it seems clear that we’re not looking at just the results of direct lighting with plenty of dimming zones. Samsung’s new panel structure is at work here.
As discussed in my previous article introducing Samsung’s various new TV technologies for 2018, the new panel structure introduces a ‘black layer’ which essentially places tiny barriers between each liquid-crystal to ensure the light from each pixel goes directly forward rather than leaking out into the ‘beams’ of neighboring pixels. Also Samsung’s latest processing engine, with its ability to finely analyze the lighting in the image and gently fade the light of each lighting zone towards its outer edges when required, also seems to be a pretty remarkable evolution in LCD backlighting, especially as it seems to work while delivering no evidence of the backlight ‘blockiness’ witnessed with previous LCD backlight innovations such as Sony’s Slim Backlight Drive and Panasonic’s ‘Honeycomb’ panel structure. I was seriously impressed, too, by how the exceptionally deep and uniform black-level the Q9F replacement was capable of reproducing while still containing plenty of subtle colour and greyscale details. It’s certainly not the case that the screen is just completely shutting off its backlights in the darkest zones to deliver absolute-but-hollow blackness
Changing tack, Samsung also ran part of the 4K HDR red crab sequence in Planet Earth II. This is a far brighter scene than the La La Land one, and more predictably the new Samsung QLED again looked the best of the four screens on show - by quite some margin! The colors of the crabs looked more dynamic but also more natural. The streams of sunlight through the trees looked punchier but also more full of subtle light and color detail. The balance of light and shade looked more consistently authentic and ‘right’. Peak details such as sunlight reflecting off the crabs’ bodies looked more dynamic. And also, more unexpectedly, the QLED picture looked more detailed and crisp than that of the other screens without looking forced or processed.
Another section of the demonstration of Samsung’s latest QLED ‘hero’ included a detailed and again convincing demonstration of how its combination of improved Quantum Dots (Samsung has made the red and green QD’s smaller to deliver a purer wider color range which now covers 100% of the DCI P3 cinematic color space) and high brightness appear to deliver colors with more accurate volumes than one of 2017’s OLED TVs. To round the picture demonstration off, we were also shown the HDR10+ dynamic metadata system the latest QLED TVs will support. Clips of a variety of bright, detailed HDR shots of mostly nature scenes, full of rocks, trees and clouds, clearly revealed more refinement in the image’s colors; a generally more dynamic, three-dimensional look to the picture; and finally, clearly more detail in the very brightest parts of the image. We’re not done with the good stuff yet, though. It also became clear during the demonstration of the new QLED 4K flagship’s black level abilities that the latest screen seems to be delivering on a key undelivered promise of 2017’s QLED models by supporting a much wider viewing angle than you usually get with LCD TVs. I’d say I could get to as much as 60 degrees off axis before I started to notice a substantial contrast or color reduction. If this holds true with the finished, launched TVs, it would class as a superb result - presumably delivered by the new near-surface prismatic lens layer the latest QLED screens use to disperse the  emerging images over a wider area (to compensate for having previously channeled the light with more focus via the new light-channeling barriers). Finally on the picture front, it was extremely clear - especially versus the Sony ZD9 and OLED models - that the new improved anti-reflection filter in the upcoming Q9F replacement is doing an even better job than last year’s QLEDS of boosting contrast and black-levels by limiting onscreen reflections."
The 2018 QLED models are the best TVs in the world!
Jan 18, 2018
Games_Spence
12
Jan 18, 2018
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Alright so let me stop you there because I believe it is you that is misinformed sir. I actually work with these televisions every day and have put extensive time into figuring out their flaws as well as their strengths. Samsung's second generation QLED televisions will have the same viewing angle issues as this current gen. when you have an LED back-lit television (regardless if its full array or edge lit) the light is shining forward through a LCD meaning your best situation is strait forward. when you're not in that center seat the light isn't coming towards you. So take the Sony Z9D which I would consider still to this point as about the best Full array Television which implements Sony's own version of a metallic layer known as "Triluminous" if you go and look at the tv it's incredibly bright it looks great strait on. when you get to about 45 degrees off axis same as with any LED panel(especially VA which both Sony and Samsung use as the primary) you lose a lot of color and contrast. alternatively emissive displays such as OLED dont have forward facing light leading to the advertised "perfect viewing angle" you were only right about one thing and that is the claim of 1000 is high. they tend to be closer to 850/900 and peak brightness. but that's not a bad thing if you check out this years tv shootout the OLED won even in Bright room because the contrast, better uniformity, and wider viewing angle just made for a much better experience. Samsung has a way to go if they want to catch up to claim the thrown again. I'll leave you with one little clipping here " Two years ago, Samsung commanded a +55% share of the premium TV segment (over $1500). It had fallen to 20.3% by the end of 2016 and hit a low of 13.2% in the first quarter of 2017. That is according to market data from IHS Markit. " people are jumping ship for a reason and that is a clearly better quality at the same or lower prices.
Jan 18, 2018
Timbo-slice
25
Jan 18, 2018
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Lol dude why do you hate OLEDs? even if 2018 qled close the gap, it’s still a marginal difference. Meaning, either tv is great.
Whats motivating your posting here in this manner?
Jan 18, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 18, 2018
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The 2018 QLED does not suffer from any issues, Samsung has made the world's best TV. Wait till you see it. In a store near you soon, better than OLED.
Jan 18, 2018
Kufu
26
Jan 18, 2018
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If you work for Samsung I'd much rather you just say it. I don't like this guerrilla marketing tactic.
Jan 18, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 18, 2018
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From another of those people invited to see the new Samsung set...
" The combined efforts of these black-improving measures are hugely effective. I looked at the new panel next to a 2017 LG OLED, alongside the Sony ZD9 from 2016 (widely regarded as the best FALD still being sold). The Samsung panel demonstrated noticeably better lighting localisation than the Sony, with less blooming.
Against the OLED? I struggled to tell the difference from a ‘normal’ position, sat down a few metres away. It was only when I walked closer to the TV that I saw some very slight blooming on the LCD. Due to the structure of LED LCD TVs, I don’t think they will ever match the look of emissive tech such as OLED. But that doesn’t mean the improvements aren’t significant."
So this year's new TV is better than last years TV, but still not as good as last years OLED? I'd be happy with either, I'll be upgrading at some point this year.
Jan 18, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 18, 2018
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Clearly that quote is from a paid/bribed loyalist to LG.
And the worst thing he could find was a particular scene where he had to move close to the QLED to find some 'slight' blooming, and yet nothing else to mention😆
So we see that even a doofus who loves OLED (and probably spent $4000 on one already) could not find a fault with the QLED except for a moment of very slight bloom in a specific scene at a specific moment, but nothing else to mention😃
And he was free to point-out anything else, but clearly the QLED was beating the OLED on every front😁
Even if someone has taken the OLED hype hook-line-&-sinker, they should be advised that the Panasonic OLED kills the LG (despite the Panasonic using an LG panel). The Panasonic picture is sharper, has better and more-natural wider colour, superior algorithms, and is brighter than the LG.
Jan 18, 2018
w00m
178
Jan 18, 2018
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Are you a samsung bot?
Jan 18, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 18, 2018
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Yes, Citizen. I'm a pre-programmed bot, a robot humanoid tied into the matrix via the internet; I see and know many things🙏
Jan 18, 2018
w00m
178
Jan 18, 2018
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You'r aggressively telling people to not buy a 2017 TV because 2018 of a different tech is better; even though the reason to buy 2017 is price point, and the reviews of the 2018 models aren't even in yet. You either are prescient, or a shill. Regardless of which you are, the comments make little sense in the context of 'big sale on widely considered best TV of 2017' discussion.
Jan 18, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 18, 2018
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So anyone suggesting that OLED technology might still be better than the latest Samsung TV in some areas, at what was a tightly controlled by Samsung viewing... is obviously an LG shill? Hahahah obvious Samsung troll is obvious.
I'll wait until the new models are all out to buy and the reviews are in before I make my decision.
Jan 18, 2018
sluflyer06
16
Jan 18, 2018
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Nice try Samsung marketing shill, get out of here.
Jan 18, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 19, 2018
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We all know you're gonna buy the Samsung 2018 QLED, you know it, I know it, they know it. Just remember, the stores favor certain brands, all because of under-the-table financial kickbacks, which means they deliberately set-up a bad picture on one and a good picture on the other.
Jan 19, 2018
trocks797
5
Jan 19, 2018
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According to Rtings, the most thorough TV reviews I have ever seen, the QLED's (both the 7 and 9) have worse picture quality than the LG B7A...and are therefor rated lower. https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/best/by-size/65-inch Scroll down on that article to see your QLED reviews.
Don't think that is going to sway you, but having a Samsung KS8000, rtings continuously states in their QLED reviews the quality is the same as my KS I bought in 2016. It's not bad, but it's far from OLED quality.
Here is their comparison: " The LG C7 is an entry-level OLED TV. It can reproduce the same perfect blacks and excellent picture quality of the more expensive models in the range, but for a much cheaper price. Compared to the Q9F, it beats it on almost all fronts. Picture quality is better on the C7, and it maintains it much better at an angle. The C7 TV doesn't produce any motion blur, but some might prefer the smoothness of the very slight blur found on the Q9. The Q9F does have better colors, being able to reproduce a larger volume. Unless you're planning on using your TV in a very bright environment at all times, you should be buying the LG C7 over the Q9F. "
Even if the 2018 QLED's are equal to the OLED's, Samsung's ridiculous price on them makes it a no-brainer to go with OLED.
Jan 19, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 19, 2018
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u u got to be a fucking idiot
Jan 19, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 19, 2018
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The 2018 QLEDs are not equal to OLED, they are better than OLED! Samsung will not price it higher than OLED, it will be cheaper.
Jan 19, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 19, 2018
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So what's your official role at Samsung?
Jan 19, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 19, 2018
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Don't worry, just be happy. Get yourself a 2018 Samsung QLED, and you'll be laughing.
Jan 19, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 19, 2018
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That's very evasive of you. The only people outside of Samsung so far, have been a few tech press given a private viewing in a tightly controlled environment which they couldn't check or change any settings.
So it seems you must work for Samsung and have some insider access. I'm just curious that's all.
Jan 19, 2018
vegetarianeater
24
Jan 19, 2018
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https://www.rtings.com/tv/tests/picture-quality/peak-brightness
Oh, looks like even the top Samsung is outclassed by Sony in terms of brightness. OLEDs are king, QLED is a marketing gimmick, it's just LEDs with quantum dots, and Samsung doesn't even do Full Array anymore, just crappy edge lighting.
You say 2018 models fix all the issues. Have you thoroughly tested one like Rtings does and will? No? Then GTFO.
Jan 19, 2018
w00m
178
Jan 19, 2018
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but.. but.. he saw it on a show floor in a controlled setting in the samsung booth and it was better.
Jan 19, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 19, 2018
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Perhaps upset he paid a lot more for a lesser picture quality, which is understandable. Haters gonna hate
Jan 19, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 19, 2018
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Ive heard Panasonic OLED's looks incredible as well however were talking price here, and for the offered price LG is working the competition. Its not even a discussion.
Jan 19, 2018
Pacoman
8
Jan 20, 2018
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QLED is just Samsung's marketing department's answer to OLED. It is still and LCD incapable of achieving the deep blacks of immisive technologies like this. On LCD displays, the night sky is always a little more charcoal grey than really black.
That said, these aren't the best OLED sets on the market, but we in the US don't get the best ones, as Panasonic makes them and I think they withdrew from the US market (panels are all manufactured by LG Display).
Jan 20, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 20, 2018
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QLEDs use Quantum Dots! Not LEDs per-se. And the QLED panel stucture & design is different than the typical LCD. You need to do some research.
The blacks on an OLED are overt, black black black, it's not too good at displaying different subtle shades of black, therefore it's not very realistic. The 2018 QLED can now display outright black as well as varying shades thereof, so the QLED is superior to OLED.
Jan 20, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 20, 2018
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The new 2018 models use full-array backlight panels.
And why do you have a foul mouth? Angry man😁
Jan 20, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 20, 2018
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Still an idiot thinking qled is better than oled
Jan 20, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 20, 2018
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Jan 20, 2018
Pacoman
8
Jan 20, 2018
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A Liquid Crystal Display is still an LCD. It still uses a backlight. It's older technology that Samsung has invested heavily in. They do great marketing to convince the public that "QLED" is anything more than marketing jargon, similar though not as successful as Apple's marketing jargon. Quantom dots are just another method of using LEDs to backlight an LCD panel.
And even if it uses a full array backlight, how is that a selling point? Just a bunch more things that can fail. Sony actually had a full color array backlit LCD set a while ago, with good color reproduction and all, but it was really unreliable.
Jan 20, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 21, 2018
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Finally someone with sense
Jan 21, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 21, 2018
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The proof is in the pudding, motor-mouth.
Wait till it is here, the QLED 2018. Then play it side-by-side with the LG OLED.
MaKe sure the screen settings are optimal on both, and wallah - you will purchase the QLED. Game over.
Jan 21, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 21, 2018
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? wtf
Jan 21, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 21, 2018
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i've now confirmed your retarded
Jan 21, 2018
Pacoman
8
Jan 21, 2018
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I would recommend watching real content on each display. Watching the optimized content made to highlight the sets' strengths while ignoring their weaknesses, will bias your view. OLEDs are not as bright as having a super-bright array of LEDs behind the LCD panel, but that would really only make a difference in a really bright room. You still won't get those deep blacks you get with OLED or plasma.
Jan 21, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 21, 2018
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Misnomers abound. Optimal settings remain optimal whether the room is dark or bright, don't you know that? And there are no weaknesses on the QLED, that's the thing, so there are no settings to convey bias.
Jan 21, 2018
Pacoman
8
Jan 21, 2018
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If OLED wasn't the superior technology out there, why would Panasonic, long in history with making professional image equipment, use LG panels in their high end sets? Real videophiles will tell you that the last generation of Panasonic plasmas were the best TVs of their time, and even sold for more than their retail price after they were discontinued. And it should be noted that plasma is superior to LCD, and only stopped being produced because Samsung stopped making them and therefore suppliers ceased making the components that went into them.
Jan 21, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 21, 2018
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Even after Samsumg bought the Pioneer Kuro (Plasma) technology they stopped making Plasmas because LCD was much cheaper to make, and because Plasmas were big&heavy, and ran hot.
Panasonic use LG panels because LG is the only manufacturer that specialises in OLED panels, much like 90% of smartphone companies use Qualcomm snapdragon cpus, other cpus can be used, but why bother, just grab it from the manufacturer who has done all the work already.
QLED is Samsung's custom version of LED, engineered in combination with superior quantum dots to produce a worldclass TV capable of matching and in some ways exceeding OLED.
Besides, look at the oled screens on Samsung phones, they never quite look right, but LCD screens always look right.
Jan 21, 2018
w00m
178
Jan 22, 2018
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Is it possible to get commenters banned for trolling?
Jan 22, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 22, 2018
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lol
Jan 22, 2018
Cullen
16
Jan 23, 2018
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You have to be trolling... OLED is far far superior... I have the LG e7p and my parents have the Q8C and the only metric that their TV is better is size... 75 vs 65 inches... They themselves admit my TV is far superior... My only question for you is what came first, the brain damage or the brainwashing?
Jan 23, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 23, 2018
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Have you witnessed the picture coming from the 2018 QLED? No, you havent't, so you have no idea what you're talking about.
Jan 23, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 23, 2018
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Neither have you. Lets wait for the proper reviews.
Jan 23, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 23, 2018
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Forget reviews, just go in person & view it with your own eyes, you'll be very happy, in awe actually.
Jan 23, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 23, 2018
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No, viewing it in a shop alone is a terrible way to judge it. Bright fluorescent lighting, and more than likely no way to check/alter settings, no way to know what source is connected up to it or the content it's playing, and how many people carry around a Leo Bodnar Tool or similar to measure input lag etc.?
This is why we have in depth reviews, and don't rely on fanboy opinions on the Internet.
Jan 23, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 23, 2018
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You're a phoney.
Jan 23, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 23, 2018
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Agreed, not "terrible" however your home has different lighting, the settings will be adjusted, the content your playing wont be LG Demos and you always want a review of the TV to avoid known issues that you dont wont any surprises from. I would window shop at the store, ask questions and go search for reviews online from multiple sites to understand the commonality of possible issues and features to make your decision on purchase.
Jan 23, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 23, 2018
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LCD fanboy, OLED on the S8 looks freaking awesome
Jan 23, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 23, 2018
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Shows how undiscerning you are. Something never quite looks right with OLED. Quantum Dot QLED is far superior - wider color gamut, more accurate colors, picture has a natural unstrained look to it. OLED is inferior.
Jan 23, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 24, 2018
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enough damn complaining
Jan 24, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 24, 2018
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Don't buy OLED, it's a scam, all hype.
Jan 24, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 24, 2018
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Its really not. QLED is close, but no cigar! By the time they get QLED to have perfect blacks with zero bloom, OLED's will have stepped it up again. Face it, QLED will ALWAYS be steps behind, lurking in the shadows. I like how Samsung gunned it to 8K for sharper images, so they can try to stop the light from emitting out causing blooming effects , and they're really close, just not close enough. LOL Just wait till its finally worth it to have 8K and LG throws that on an OLED, #OLEDISBEAST
Jan 24, 2018
mlgaudio
14
Jan 25, 2018
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finally a the last nail in the coffin
Jan 25, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 25, 2018
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The 2018 QLED already has perfect blacks and no bloom! Samsung has done it already. The picture on the LG OLED looked shoddy next to the 2018 QLED model Lol
Jan 25, 2018
Videoguy92
1
Jan 25, 2018
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QLED is still relying on the old LCD LED technology but with a quantum dot matrix film in between the layers of the screen. This tech was established in the wake of OLED tech. There is also information floating around suggesting that Samsung specifically named it "Q"LED to help confuse potential costumers into thinking it was similar to OLED. (but this information, i could not find a reputable source for, but it is understandable. As I myself also was confused at first and thought this was Samsung's proprietary version of OLED). The downside of QLED is that it still rely's on back and edge lighting. As for which is better? OLED has always lacked in the Nit's department(which is brightness basically), but is superior in color accuracy, contrast, and black levels. And this has been tested by multiple sources.
Jan 25, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 25, 2018
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You're wrong. The Samsung QLED 2018 model was tested side-by-side with the LG OLED, and the QLED had better color accurracy, better contrast, and better blacks, and if you had red (past tense of read) my initial comment, then you would not have dribbled your ignorant reply here.
Jan 25, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 25, 2018
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No, red is definitely a colour.
Jan 25, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 25, 2018
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Lead (led) Read (red) Plead (pled)
English needs to be modified to reflect the past tense of these words. And the more people that break the current dysfunction in order to correct it, the more likely it will come into common usage and rectify the current anomaly. Please get aboard.
Jan 25, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 25, 2018
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The past tense of read, is read, not red. People need to learn English.
Jan 25, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 25, 2018
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Erhh, wrong again. Reviews were done, ive read them. QLED from a natural watching distance looked just about equal to OLED, however once they get closer to the screen you can see a hint of blooming occur. Listen, its nothing to feel shameful about. I know your fanboyism is off the charts and you will fight tooth and nail for yours. Im just stating the facts, dont like em? Dont read them, keep it moving, i'll be over here....watching a real TV work my eyeballs into an epileptic seizure with its perfection!! ;p
Jan 25, 2018
Drewxke
11
Jan 25, 2018
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He's right, ive seen the reviews as well.
Jan 25, 2018
Mbot
196
Jan 25, 2018
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The thing is - it was the OLED that had the slight blooming and the QLED had none.
Jan 25, 2018
Raithmir
650
Jan 26, 2018
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Fake news.
Jan 26, 2018
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