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Showing 1 of 5 conversations about:
LazyTeddy
54
Jun 15, 2021
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that 8mm driver is not good
Jun 15, 2021
Dittobox
93
Jun 15, 2021
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Any particular reason?
Jun 15, 2021
LazyTeddy
54
Jun 15, 2021
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It makes the whole headphone sound funky
Jun 15, 2021
Soix
19
Jun 15, 2021
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Have you heard them after break-in?
Jun 15, 2021
The_Jniac
323
Jun 17, 2021
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Break in is a myth.
Jun 17, 2021
Soix
19
Jun 17, 2021
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Yeah, no it’s really not. Speak directly with any manufacturer of headphones, amps, DACs, etc. (as I have for years) and they’ll all explain to you the physical reasons why certain materials in their products require a certain amount of break-in time to sound as intended. Having reviewed high-end audio equipment for 15+ years I’ve quite a bit of experience with new gear, and some of it sounds downright awful out of the box. But, if you don’t hear any change then good for you.
Jun 17, 2021
ElectronicVices
2828
Jun 18, 2021
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Well foam gets softer/deforms with use, so right off the bat you've already made a false assertion without even touching upon other aspects of break-in. This change in pads over time can reduce driver distance or improve the seal in close baffle designs... both of which will alter the interaction with our ears and thus the perceived sound.
Jun 18, 2021
The_Jniac
323
Jun 19, 2021
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DACs break in? By what possible mechanism can they possibly "break in" enough to be audible? I am not surprised that manufacturers would tell you that their stuff needs breaking in though; the industry is full of the misinformed and outright charlatans.
Jun 19, 2021
The_Jniac
323
Jun 19, 2021
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Well, here are measurements disproving DAC break-in. Here is a measurement showing no change beyond margin of error; there is also a video showing how known psychological processes can produce the false perception of break-in, which explains why measurements do not show differences that are large enough to be audible. Lastly, here is the most thorough test of headphone break-in of which I am aware, using a headphone widely believed to need breaking-in, demonstrating differences that are consistently less than 1dB.
Jun 19, 2021
Soix
19
Jun 19, 2021
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Sorry but I’m not going to read your links or respond with any that support break-in as a real thing because you’ve obviously made up your mind it doesn’t exist so just not gonna waste my time here. I will say that the human ear is infinitely more capable than what we can measure, so while I certainly find measurements valuable and useful they are not nearly comprehensive or sensitive enough to describe everything we hear so can’t “prove” in and of themselves that break-in doesn’t exist. CDs were supposed to be “perfect sound forever” until we heard clear differences between players/DACs with our ears and started measuring and understanding things like jitter, etc. that explained why our ears were indeed correct. Like I said, if you can’t hear break-in with new gear good for you, but my ears and experience (along with most other experienced reviewers and manufacturers) consistently indicate otherwise.
Jun 19, 2021
The_Jniac
323
Jun 20, 2021
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I am not sure where you are getting this information, but most of it is wrong. Here is a good primer on digital audio from the people who maintain FLAC and several other audio codecs. AudioScienceReview also has a library of reference materials that might help you to better understand electronic audio.
Jun 20, 2021
ElectronicVices
2828
Jun 20, 2021
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Where in my reply did you read anything about DAC? I know you are just looking for another thread to assert your view but come on man...
Jun 20, 2021
Soix
19
Jun 20, 2021
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No thanks. I’m good. If you spent more time listening to equipment and trusting your ears rather than reading stuff that supports the case you’ve already decided is right you might actually learn something. Feel free to reinsert your head in the sand where it appears to be most comfortable.
Jun 20, 2021
The_Jniac
323
Jun 20, 2021
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It has been known for decades that human perception is not reliable. The placebo effect was known over two hundred years ago, and more recent research has revealed that our perceptions and memories are extremely susceptible to being altered by our beliefs and the things to which we choose to pay attention.
Jun 20, 2021
Soix
19
Jun 20, 2021
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Look, I’m not going down this rabbit hole any further because it’s useless and endless. Like I said before, if you don’t hear the effects of break-in that’s fine. Ive heard it with dozens of new products I had in for review — and believe me, I didn’t want to hear it because frankly it’s a PITA — and for that reason would never conduct any critical assessments of a piece of gear before it had at least 100 hours playtime on it (nor does any credible reviewer I know of). Someone asked Paul McGowan of PS Audio if he ever verified break-in effects by comparing a new product off his line with one already run in and this is what he said: “I can routinely take two identical pieces of gear, say two DACS, one brand new, the other in use for perhaps a week. I can identify the difference between the two easily. It’s repeatable and demonstrable.” Now, you can have your opinion and try to justify it with whatever measurements or studies you want if it makes you feel better, but either thousands of very experienced audiophiles, reviewers, and equipment design engineers/manufacturers are unwittingly deceiving themselves or there’s actually something to this. Which seems more likely? Peace out.
Jun 20, 2021
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