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HalMc
42
Jan 6, 2017
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Mine came last night. Made in China = boo, but honestly I knew that going into it and that is the only negative thing I have to say about it, it is the EDC flashlight I have been wanting for years. It's exactly what I hoped for.
Jan 6, 2017
Bobraz
1657
Jan 26, 2017
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I'm puzzled as to why should China be "= boo"?
After all China manufactures a lot of stuff, from tchotchkes to the most premium phones and electronics equipment. If you have a smartphone, a TV, or audio electronics at home, those are " =boo" too?
Jan 26, 2017
HalMc
42
Jan 26, 2017
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Because I buy American whenever I can to support our manufacturing sector here. If you are not from America, you might not care where stuff is made as much which i get. But for us here, with our decimated manufacturing sector, it is always painful for me to purchase something made elsewhere.
Jan 26, 2017
Bobraz
1657
Jan 26, 2017
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I totally understand and agree 120%. I, too, try to buy local (I'm in Canada) as much as I can. But it's not making any difference.
It's just that for most mass market goods, local is not an option anymore (niche and "long tail" markets are perfect for local goods and specialized manufacturing, on the other hand - but that is another discussion). Clothes, electronics, usual home objects, all would not be affordable to the mainstream person if manufactured in North America.
Not to start a rant (oh, shoot, I just did), but I believe that the fault lies not with the Chinese or other countries (that is pure demagogy to transpose the blame onto foreign entities directly - even if that wins votes) but the culprits are the companies and corporations that have put profit at the top of their priorities, regardless of the impacts on their respective cities, states, countries. In the 50's, until the 70's, social and local impacts were still being considered in priority when making manufacturing decisions; that was true even by big corporations such as GE and GM - they felt a responsibility to their local communities, cities, etc. Not so much anymore. 80's corporate greed buried those priorities.
If companies of all sizes in the so-called first world considered the local social impacts of delocalization of production in labor intensive industries, and that some would still elect to keep their production in-shore - while relying on technological advancement to keep costs relatively competitive with cheap labor countries -, I believe our first world countries would still have balanced and thriving manufacturing sectors.
But unfortunately most companies and corporations today choose to send their manufacturing elsewhere to save on labor, avoid capital expenditures (i.e. avoid having to make investments aimed at technological advancements - which itself creates more jobs and social wealth) and choose to solely focus on maximizing their benefits and hoarding their cash flows, at the expense of everything else (including their workers, and the environment).
You and I can buy local all we want, but it's hard to fight that type of capitalism with our little local purchases. This has to be a society-wide desire to change, to start with those who publicly rage against delocalization while themselves massively sending manufacturing overseas **cough cough Trump clothes made in China**...
/End of Rant
Jan 26, 2017
HalMc
42
Jan 26, 2017
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I don't disagree with any of the above.
Jan 26, 2017
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