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Waba359
3
Feb 10, 2017
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What is the differnce between electronic and mechanical switch? Is electronic simulated?
Feb 10, 2017
Waba359
3
Feb 10, 2017
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As well, how do you charge the tailswitch? I saw someone mention they had to charge it, but I've never heard of charging your tailswitsh. Thanks!
Feb 10, 2017
B.man
124
Feb 10, 2017
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" An electronic switch uses input to a circuit to activate or change functions on a light. The circuit remains powered at some level all the time. When the button is pressed, the circuit reads it and then the driver takes the programmed action. Electronic switches typically do not need to carry the full current of the light so can be smaller and lighter than mechanical switches. More importantly, from a mechanical standpoint electronic switches are simpler: they are momentary pushbutton switches that only sustain a connection while the button is held down. In contrast, a mechanical switch makes or breaks the connection each time the switch is pressed. There's a rotating piece of plastic that clicks on or off in them, much like that found in a retractable ballpoint pen. Things to look for to determine what type of switch you have: Mechanical switch: 1. Usually stiffer than electronic switches, but not always. 2. Long travel - typically the button must be depressed quite a bit to cycle the switch. 3. Often a loud click. 4. Switch guts are considerably larger due to need to accommodate rotating clicky mechanism. However, the wiring is much simpler. If you can pull the switch out of the tailcap pretty easily it's more likely to be a mechanical switch. 5. Two types: "foward clicky" - which turns the light on with a half-press, and clicks it on with a full-press. And "reverse clicky", which clicks the light on with a full press, then uses a half-press to change modes. Reverse clicky is more common in today's lights. Electronic switch: 1. Typically very short travel and very quiet. The button does not need to be depressed very far. Similar to the power switch found on a lot of computer monitors. 2. Can allow other types of actions besides just on and off. For instance, with an electronic switch the light can be programmed to do something based on how long you hold the button down. 3. Since electronic switches are mechanically simpler they should theoretically last longer than a mechanical switch. 4. Since the circuit remains powered at all times with an electronic switch there is some parasitic current drain." http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?344371-Electronic-switch-or-mechanical

You just put a battery in. The switch will charge the battery when it needs to.
Feb 10, 2017
Waba359
3
Feb 10, 2017
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Oh ok thanks!
Feb 10, 2017
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