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DannyMilks
4537
Apr 26, 2016
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I am thrilled to announce that our first Massdrop Custom Ultralight product will be available this Friday, 6am PST. In the first drop there will be 200 quilts available, with variable ship times from June through August. The earlier you join the drop, the better chance you have of receiving your quilt early.
This quilt is really a collaborative effort from the thousands of votes for various quilts in our polls, the success of our Enlightened Equipment drops, countless conversations with cottage manufacturers, leaders in the communities, ultralight bloggers, and regular folks like you and me. Thank you all for your help in making this a reality.
This marks the first time a quilt has gone through EN 13537 certification for temperature rating. Previously, only sleeping bags have been been tested, and even then less than half of the sleeping bags available on the market have gone through this process. The only difference was that for our quilt test, we supplied an EE Hoodlum Balaclava with 8oz Apex insulation to cover the head and neck. The results are that this quilt would be appropriate down to 20° for the average man, and ~30° for the average woman. A good primer on the EN-rating can be found here: http://sectionhiker.com/deciphering-en13537-sleeping-bag-temperature-ratings/
Apr 26, 2016
Scubaguy5
0
Apr 27, 2016
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What will the cost be, approximately?
Apr 27, 2016
Joomy
211
Apr 27, 2016
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Where did you find an 8-ounce filled Hoodlum? EE only make up to a 4-ounce fill. Is that a typo or did you really get them to make a double thick hood just for the test?
Apr 27, 2016
DannyMilks
4537
Apr 27, 2016
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It was a custom order, specifically made for the quilt EN-testing. That 8oz Hoodlum is seriously puffy. @Joomy
Apr 27, 2016
Joomy
211
Apr 27, 2016
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Interesting. So I'm guessing that with a regular thickness of APEX the set up wouldn't have achieved a 20F rating on the test. Did you happen to test it with a 4-oz APEX Hoodlum?
Apr 27, 2016
DannyMilks
4537
Apr 27, 2016
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The EN testing is done with just a baselayer on the mannequin. The head is covered by a sleeping bag's hood, but that doesn't work for a quilt so we had to provide something. The loft of the quilt is 2.5+ inches and the loft of a Hoodlum made with 8oz Apex is about 1 inch. So, even with the custom made Hoodlum, the head was still the coldest point on the mannequin (with a CLO of 3). It could be argued that we should have made a custom Hoodlum with 2.5 inches of loft to match the quilt, and then maybe it would be rated at 15F. With a standard 4oz Hoodlum, we think the temp rating would be 22-23F.
Clearly, the choice of head apparel affects the temperature plus or minus a few degrees. This is no surprise to anyone here. And, all of of who use quilts have different ways of keeping our heads warm at night. Just as an example, and not as a guideline or general recommendation: when it's mild (mid50s and warmer), I wear a Rab Meco 165 Hoody with my light synthetic beanie. Colder than that I I use that same Hoody with a BlackRock Gear Down Hat at minimum. Typically, I have a down jacket with hood or even a down parka, and use that in combination with whatever base layer and fleece or down beanie that I have.
How would you correlate real-world usage for the EN testing? We went with product (custom Hoodlum) that would represent a conservative level of warmth provided by your headwear at 20F. In the coldest temperature, most people are likely to be wearing more than a baselayer and 8oz Hoodlum. Your thoughts @Joomy?
Apr 27, 2016
Joomy
211
Apr 28, 2016
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Hi Danny. Thanks for the detailed answer. I can see how the hood would be the trickiest part about measuring a quilt. I think it's legitimate to want to minimise heat loft from the head using some sort of hood, but yes I guess I was a little surprised at the weight of insulation used. But I see that EE use 8oz thickness in their 20F synthetic quilt so I can see why you went with that option.
But I guess if I were new to quilts I would want to be aware that even pairing a quilt with a relatively thick separate hood like a 4oz hoodlum, or down jacket hood, or a down beanie, will generally not give you the same level of head insulation as say the hood of a typical 20F hooded sleeping bag.
Apr 28, 2016
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