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gardey
84
Aug 23, 2018
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Here is my two pinches of salt since this is "In the works." To start, this isn't a slicer. It's a serrated slicer at the closest if using fancy names. My impression is that this knife is meant for the enthusiast home cook who cuts breads in small quantities, i.e. for breakfast and the occasional sandwich. On the other hand,for the culinary student, especially a Pastry Arts major, or someone thinking of joining the industry where you cut alot of bread, this knife is not recommended. As you may tell, the shape of the edge makes sharpening at home extremely difficult to downright impossible -this is the main reason the steel quality of a bread knife is not what you should be looking for. When I worked at a bakery, I reached a conclusion that bread knives are a consumable, so having a sharp new bread knife at $30~40 every month or so is better if you need to go through a few hundreds of slices within that time. Also, while this knife meets the usual requirement of culinary institutes in the US, which is most commonly a 10in blade, the actual serration seems to be 8~9in. This is important as proper, intended cutting method of a bread knife is to saw, therefore the actual length of the item you can cut is 6~7in. (This means you will have difficulty with cake cutting). Additionally, because the tip is rounded instead of having a point, you cannot create an entry point, therefore making cutting things that are larger than stated above a chore if perfect or very consistent slices are desired. The blade thickness and rigidity is key when perfection is sought, though no manufacturer ever seems to think the spine and edge width is crucial. On top of that, because the blade width is thin while the blade is straight, cutting the bottom crust to release the bread off the board will not be an easy cut. With all of this said, if this knife wants to be a bread knife that can justify its price, it needs to be: longer in length, have an offset handle, have a point, and extend the serration to the entire edge. If this wants to be a cake knife, it needs to be: much longer in length, and have a very flexible blade. However, this would be for the efficient professional who knows what they are doing, where cutting, and frosting the cake is done all with one knife. In this case, the rounded tip makes it closer to a straight spatula.
Aug 23, 2018
blackcat1
8
Feb 1, 2020
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First designed as a pastry knife years ago. Most pastry chefs I know own what is commonly known now in North America as a superslicer. Welcome to re- branding. A beveled edged knife is perfect at cutting cakes, especially in a good pastry department. This said, why would it not be a good tool for a pastry/culinary student? Your reasoning makes no sense.
Feb 1, 2020
gardey
84
Feb 3, 2020
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First of all, I was reached out from Massdrop at the time for my feedback, a few months before they gave up on culinary items as a whole, and then changed to Drop. (This is why there is no Cooking community any more). I posted this comment when this knife was supposedly in the pre-release stage, "in-development" or whatever word they used, but basically it was not available for sale at the time. Also, I wish you thought twice before necroing this, which was about a year and a half ago. But thanks to you, I now know they still have some culinary items under EDC (for some reason), and this... thing. Regarding your question, have you even bothered to read my comment? I prefaced that if its for home use, like in your review, its "okay," but definitely not for the price... (I swear it was cheaper back then. $90 at time of writing this comment.) Even $30 for this type of knife is too expensive for me, when a basic one is sold for around $10. (Will the edge last more than 9 times the life of a $10 blade? Probably not.) For professional use, the length of the blade already disqualifies it for a candidate. I said "usual requirement of culinary institutes" to be safe, but I will now say that my culinary institution -required- me to have a 10" -blade- or else I would be forbidden to use that knife. For example, for a pastry worker, a round whole 8" diameter cake, one that this knife could barely cut comfortably due to its short edge, is a petite size that is on the rare side in the US. When cutting, keeping the layer level is mandatory. With a smaller blade, let alone a rounded tip which steals actual cutting edge length, this means I will have to draw the knife mid-cut into the layer to saw through, leaving an indentation. It is virtually unnoticeable, but it's still there, and in less seasoned hands, this is most likely where a change in cutting angle will occur. If my knife edge doesn't leave the cutting layer, then as long as I maintain the angle, it stays as one perfect layer. For mass production, I made layers for a cake in sheet pans. With a larger blade, I can get to business with one slice. With this, I would have to cut the sheet into thirds to be properly manageable, which is additional time and space I have to reserve. When I worked at a Japanese cake shop, I used a 16" and increased production by cutting two 6" or a combination with a 8" in one slice. I'm sure no one at a cake shop would want to use a knife this small. As for bread, I worked in an artisan bakery, where the bread comes in all shapes and sizes. We also used the slices of bread for sandwiches (go ahead, make fun -- it takes one to know how difficult it is to cut a sandwich without altering the shape of the bread, especially when said sandwich asks for multiple layers and uses bread so soft a light press causes indentation.) When cutting through literal dozens of bread everyday, experimenting with many types of knives to try to make my life easier, a knife with only 9" of serration is not what I want. When cutting a baguette at a hard bias, 9" isn't enough. For softer bread, or even a ciabatta with a thin crust, then I rather just use my sharp chef knife than some random serrated edge, since I don't damage the outer layer and can cut through instead of having to lift my knife back up mid-cut to start another saw-through. This is also true for when I need to cut a completed cake, especially with more layers. When cutting through a hard crusted boule, a reverse-scallop edge just bounces off and 9" means I need two slices to halve it. Returning to the rounded tip, it doesn't help one bit when I need to cut the bottom crust. I can either lessen the life span of my serrated edge by sawing into the cutting board, or I can cut to the cutting board and sweep with the tip to release the slice. Additionally, if I have a pointed edge, I can do tip work, or create the starting incision for cutting something more stubborn. A rounded edge only has its use for those who are more old-schooled or pressed on time, who will use the same knife as an icing spatula, though this is considered "too dangerous" and requires certain flexibility to the knife (which I bet this one doesn't have). There really is no purpose to a rounded tip other than idiot proofing -- reversed-scalloped edges are good for cutting tomatoes and even my tomato knife has a pointed tip. So, as a person who has different serrated knives for different purposes, this knife is trying to be many things but meets beats none for me. I will say again that serrated edges are virtually impossible to sharpen yourself. It is possible in theory, but I have never yet to find anyone who actually has attempted, or continues to do so after doing it a few times When you go through hundreds of bread in a week, I rather get on with my life with a new blade I bought from Amazon than to spend a few hours trying to, and most likely failing, at sharpening at serrated edge. With all that said... you may be a Chef, but is your main knife a serrated edge, let alone this one? I hate to say it but if you can use the same serrated edge for 25 years, I find it hard to believe you use that knife on a daily basis at work. If you say that you maintained this knife for that period, I assume you know proper knife maintenance... then why are you still using this instead of your sharp chef knife?
(Edited)
Feb 3, 2020
blackcat1
8
Feb 12, 2020
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Hi: Thank you for your comments: I am an independent chef with experience in 5 star hotels, private/golf clubs, restaurants both owned and worked in, culinary institutes & large special functions: Olympics, G8, G20 etc, as well as teaching. I have a good amount of knives, everything from 10 & 12" french, boning, flex boning for fish, paring, carving, serrated, cleaver, salmon slicer, santoku & bevelled. My weapon of choice for a bevelled edge is 10" Wusthof Trident super slicer, (at a pinch, Victorianox do a cheaper and lighter model as well). I have 2 of these in different knife kits, depending on where I will be working and what the facilities are. You can use it in one department to slice medium rare strip or rib and in another to cut & pick up cake slices due to the fact it has a rounded edge and can be used as a spatula, & I find a bevelled edge cuts cleaner than serrated. As you can imagine, in no way shape or form would I even dream that my knives would definitely last 25 years: wear & tear, loss & theft are all part of having your own equipment in the food industry, as any chef will tell you. As for serrated edges knives, I don't normally carry one in my knife kit. This being said, I am not sure why you would keep commenting on serrated edged. Everyone knows, that you are better off sending a serrated edged knife to be sharpened professionally, I wouldn't touch one. You may be getting muddled with serrated and bevelled. As stated in a previous comment, you can sharpen a bevelled edged knife but only on one side of course. To sharpen between the grooves, you can use a steal meant for a chainsaw, then finish off with a good knife block or sharpening steel. In regards to culinary students. Interestingly enough, most students once they are either in an apprenticeship or have decided to directly move into the culinary workforce, change their equipment/knives, normally a piece at a time to something that better suits them. Choosing a knife is like choosing a pair of glass frames, very individual. Lastly, I guess in the US things are done differently, as stated before, the Trident super slicer was not called this when Wusthof first introduced it as part of their line of knives. When I was a culinary student, all my pastry professors had one, but of course, they were either European or for some reason New Zealand. Again, thanks for your comments, (in my wildest dreams, did I have any inclination that Massdrop had reached out to you), & I will try to take them with a grain of salt and not jibes. Have a lovely day.
Feb 12, 2020
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