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Russellcon
0
Nov 28, 2018
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Meh
Nov 28, 2018
Mendy770
53
Nov 28, 2018
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Give it at least a 40 hour burn in and then see what they sound like..
Nov 28, 2018
Zeeeeeek
1
Dec 4, 2018
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I ordered these headphones too. Before i "meh" this headphones, I want to ask you, what a burn in is and how to apply/make this "burn in" ?
Dec 4, 2018
Mendy770
53
Dec 4, 2018
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Burn in means letting it play at decent volume allowing the drivers to so to speak "open up". It's a process which all high end headphones have to go through. By me, when I just got my 58x, it sounded a bit metallic and harsh etc. After they burned in, it sounded a world of a difference!!!
Dec 4, 2018
Zeeeeeek
1
Dec 4, 2018
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Thank you very much for the fast response, Mendy :) I guess, I'll just use my headphones for some days, just listening to my favourited music and after 40 hours the headphones will reach their full potential?
Dec 4, 2018
Mendy770
53
Dec 4, 2018
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You're welcome!! They should, but the more they burn in, the better. I heard once that they reach there full potential after 100 hours but I don't know if that's really the case with these. You'll see yourself, the more there used, the better they'll sound (till full burn in)
Dec 4, 2018
Uzuzu
1385
Dec 7, 2018
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so many newbie audiophiles having their cherries popped they think the headphones are breaking in. I presume it's because most consumer-grade products have such rolled off, dull treble a lot of people are off-put, then become used to the clarity and end up really enjoying these.
Dec 7, 2018
eddiezr
53
Dec 7, 2018
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"Burn in" is definitely a debatable phenomenon. I know that certain speaker materials do, in fact, loosen up a bit after use, such as stiff paper cones, which results in smoother, deeper, richer, more musical, etc. sound. But the degree of that change is very hard to definitively declare, often a very subjective experience. Even tiny little headphone drivers can become less stiff with use, and produce nicer, more refined sounds. But you're right that most often what people think is "burn in" is them simply growing accustomed to the particular sound of the headphone, getting familiar with it. I didn't think the HD 58x Jubilee had especially good bass at first, even though technical stats show it to be the most bass responsive of the 600 line. But now I believe I can hear that expanded bass, and I even think it's still getting better? So whaddaya gonna do! The war rages on...
Dec 7, 2018
Mendy770
53
Dec 9, 2018
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Interesting to note regarding what you write, that previously once one of these similar chats, someone mentioned that there's no such a thing as "burn in" and all it is is getting used to the sound so i decided to see if it's true. It happened to be (by divine providence) that I ordered a pair for my friend so I took his pair (which just came in and wasn't "burnt in") and tried them on and then tried mine and there was a CLEAR difference!! His sounded a bit metallic and maybe I could call it cluttery? Only when it was I would say drums alone then it sounded good but otherwise no...mine sounded allot more separate, clear, and in general better sounding. So I don't know what people think or know but my ears heard what they heard ;)
Dec 9, 2018
eddiezr
53
Dec 9, 2018
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Too often in this hurly burly rough n tumble world of ours our impressionable, naive ears hear only that which we are brave--of foolish!--enough to allow them to hear. No, no, I'm just being facetious. ; ) As I said, there CAN be a process of loosening and "settling in" of the driver materials which we can fairly call burn in. My point--dull as it is, and not unlike the large one atop my oft vacuous skull--is that there seems to be a debatable, subjective amount of that process occurring. Even under more stringent laboratory testing the audible effects of "burn in" are not always as prominent as we might believe, or want to believe. Many of the materials used today in headphone drivers are not nearly as pliant as were the materials used in decades past. Paper cones certainly benefit from a few hours of initial careful usage to allow the woven pulp fibers to soften and relax resulting in deeper, more full, less harsh, etc. sound. But some of the newer, more technologically sophisticated materials found in headphone drivers--polypropylene, fiberglass, Kevlar, titanium!--are much less likely to become noticeably transformed through initial or even prolonged usage. Those esoteric materials are chosen, in fact, for their inherent structural integrity which by definition--and natural law--renders them much less vulnerable to the forces which otherwise results in the condition we commonly call "burn in." By design and by default, many modern headphone drivers are simply impervious to the phenomenon. But to each his or her or their own. Or as they say in Internetland, YMMV...
(Edited)
Dec 9, 2018
Mendy770
53
Dec 11, 2018
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Ya, what you're saying is probably true and the reason why I heard a difference with time is bc of whatever u wrote regarding the paper that's inside or whatever...i don't really know what they do, I know nothing regarding that, all I know is what I hear:)
Dec 11, 2018
Russellcon
0
Apr 21, 2019
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Sennheiser does not reconize burn in and discourages it. They say they are going to go out of the box.
Apr 21, 2019
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