Showing 1 of 18 conversations about:
dodoretti
3
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
So you just drop raw food in a container and the Nomiku will cook them? I'm not getting how to cook food with this, can anyone explain?
Oct 16, 2017
loganville
26
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
You should probably just Google sous vide... Basically you put the food in a bag and then in a large pot of water, the device circulates the water and heats it up to a specific temperature.
Oct 16, 2017
Andrew_NY
183
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
Oct 16, 2017
dodoretti
3
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
Thanks for the reply, I know what sous vide is, but what got me confused is that I thought you needed a special device to seal the food in the plastic bag. I didn't know you could just throw them in a Ziploc and attach it to the pot (it's not technically 100% sous vide like this)
Oct 16, 2017
ChuckDee
1790
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
You can use a vacuum sealer if you want (there are several on Amazon), and you can also use immersion sealing. I've used both, and there has been no appreciable difference in the food I've done.
Oct 16, 2017
KrystalP
8
Nomiku
Oct 16, 2017
bookmark_border
If you ziplock with the water displacement method it is still true sous vide. The vacuum in that case is water pressure and gravity rather than forced air displacement. We love science At Nomiku.
Oct 16, 2017
jersey_boy
194
Oct 17, 2017
bookmark_border
you essentially vacuum seal food and put it in a temperature controlled environment (water). the device has a heating element, and circulates the water to maintain an exact temperature. this temperature control allows you do do some things that cannot be done any other way with current tech., such as certain custards and egg dishes, tenderized rare/medium rare shortribs, etc. Given that the water will be typically controlled within 1 degree F on most circulators, and a fraction of a degree on better ones, you can control the exact level of doneness of a food, from the whole way through, and cannot burn/overcook the doneness as the food cant exceed the ambient temp of the water. so what does this mean? it means you can do things like a perfect medium rare steak end to end without the brown well done rings, and just a quick sear to build the char crust. it means you can slow cook for long periods of time to the exact level of doneness you want so that you can change the textures of foods while maintaining the same level of doneness by extending the duration of the cook ( such as cooking cheap cuts for long periods of time but ending up with textures similar to a braise or a steak from a medium rare cook on a cheap cut. hope this was helpful.
to give you an example of something i did this weekend, i coooked some eggs sous vide to a temp where the yolk became malleable, but still liquid, and then shed the whites and fried the yolks in panko while the egg yolks remained gelatinous. pretty neat stuff. i mostly cook steaks and chicken, and with my wifi units. sometimes, i'll leave a seasoned steak in a vac bag/ziplock in an ice bath all day, and then 2 hours or so before i come home from work ill go in via app and turn them on, so i have a 100% perfect medium rare ribeye ready to sear when i get home. I've even made huge batches of creme brulee in mason jars to serve a whole party with my sous vide setups. and im an amateur with this stuff.
Oct 17, 2017
dodoretti
3
Oct 17, 2017
bookmark_border
Thank you for taking the time to explain, really new to the concept and this helped. I saw a few companies that sell already sous vide marinated meat. Does that mean I can just throw that in water as is and it will cook? I love the concept, as no frying is not required and not many dishes washing to do at the end of the day!
Oct 17, 2017
jersey_boy
194
Oct 17, 2017
bookmark_border
generally you will still need to sear your food in a skillet or grill or with a creme brulee torch after, to get a char/crust. some people sear it first (whats called a pre-sear). this aspect is fairly subjective, but generally you would do this, at least with meats. you can also throw frozen stuff in too, generally an extra half hour added to cook time. sometimes i'll buy vac sealed food from the market or from shops like crowdcow and will season while i sear after immersion cooking with the sv.
Oct 17, 2017
braswes
100
Oct 19, 2017
bookmark_border
For the sear after - cast iron pans are your friend.
Oct 19, 2017
braswes
100
Oct 19, 2017
bookmark_border
Serious Eats is a great source for sous vide recipes and information.
Oct 19, 2017
View Full Discussion