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Vloshko
152
Dec 6, 2016
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Some math and general information for anyone considering this: Icebreaker, Smartwool, Mountain Hardwear, and a few others use a mix of 50% Merino Wool & 50% Acrylic. Although Acrylic is considered by some as a good replacement for Wool, there are notable advantages and disadvantages. Keep in mind that this blend will be stronger than 100% Merino Wool (it still deteriorates relatively quickly compared to Wool and against Polyester), most people find the acrylic to be scratchy/uncomfortable & some people have allergies to it. Resistant to sunlight & weather, wicks moisture, light weight, and it provides warmth to the wearer Patagonia... well that's the only company I'm aware of that uses "legitimate" Merino Wool with Polyester. Which is the best combination in my opinion since Polyester will last a very long time in extremely rough conditions. Plus it doesn't shrink or crease easily and is relatively hard to tear. However, on a biodegradable note: it's not... but it is recyclable and retains it's quality extremely well. Some people are allergic to it, it can appear shiny, stains are a pain in the butt to remove, but worst of all IMO it doesn't breath. North x North, Schnee's, Minus 33, and some non outdoor clothing companies (such as: Wool & Prince, Nonix - maybe?) use 100% Merino Wool, ranging from 115-165 GSM and 16-18.5 Microns. A few problems that Wool has are that if it does shrink, it's pretty much FUBAR... The chances that you are literally allergic to super-fine Merino Wool would be super-duper rare and is more often caused by the fabric rubbing against a sensitive part of your skin. Wool also "pills", and can be sensitive to some climates. In my opinion the good outweigh the bad, for instance it is very resilient, an excellent retardant for fire & dirt & static, superb insulator, natural & biodegradable & recyclable & sustainable, almost all dyes work on it, when treated it can be both moisture wicking and water resistant, it's honestly not difficult/time consuming to properly clean, and all the other properties listed here (ie: 6x stronger than cotton, wrinkle resistant, odor resistant, yada yada yada).
Saving Money Math: North x North's piece of cloth(non-discounted=$75.00, discounted=$64.99 lowest) is 42"x42" which give us approximately 12.25 square feet and that comes out to approximately $5.30 per square foot. A non-discounted Men's-Large-long-sleeve-shirt offered by Schnee's($195), Minus 33($109.99), and Wool & Prince($128) are about 36"x72" which is 18 square feet. If we average the prices listed for the shirts we get $144.33. This gives us approximately $8 per square foot .
TL;DR: 100% Merino wool is frackin awesome as proved by science and nature. Most places that offer same quality or better sell for $8 per square foot, lowest drop price is $5.30 per square foot. Worth it 10/10.
P.S. Don't understand something? Google it! Ya lazy car camper.
Dec 6, 2016
DannyMilks
4538
Dec 6, 2016
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Thanks for breaking it down @Vloshko . Also to note is that all those brands make products in Asia, whereas the NxN products are sewn in the US from Australian wool.
Dec 6, 2016
HubeyDoobyDoo
476
May 18, 2017
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And our minimum wages are pretty high in Australia.
May 18, 2017
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