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Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

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Product Description
Though digital audio has come a long way, it’s hard to beat the crisp and clear sound of a CD. Packed with tons of modern features, the Onkyo DX-C390 six-disk CD changer will help you get the most from your music Read More

Affordable Audiophile-Grade Sound

Though digital audio has come a long way, it’s hard to beat the crisp and clear sound of a CD. Packed with tons of modern features, the Onkyo DX-C390 six-disk CD changer will help you get the most from your music. It features a multi-bit D/A converter and 128x oversampling for an ultra-precise sound with little to no sound errors. The VLSC (Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry) provides a smoother sound, while the Direct Digital Path coating helps protect the delicate audio signal from noise emitted by the surrounding circuits. You can load six disks up at once and even change between disks without having to stop the playback. Analog, optical, and coaxial digital audio outputs give you a variety of ways to integrate the changer into your current system. 

Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

Features

  • 6 discs
  • MP3 playback
  • Multi-bit D/A converter
  • 128x oversampling
  • VLSC (Vector Linear Shaping Circuitry)
  • Direct Digital Path
  • Change up to 5 discs without stopping playback
  • 40-track memory playback
  • Analog, optical, and coaxial digital audio outputs
  • RI-compatible remote control
Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback
Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

Specs

  • Model number: DX-C390
  • Single-bit DAC: Multi
  • AccuPulse Quartz System
  • Changer type: Carousel
  • Number of repeat modes: 6
  • Random track memory: 40
  • Shuffle/random play
  • Direct track access: By remote
  • Digital output: 1 optical, 1 coaxial
  • Analog output (Fixed) 
  • RI remote control
  • Digital filter: 352.8 kHz, 128x oversampling
  • Frequency response: 5 Hz–20 kHz
  • S/N ratio: 96 dB
  • Dynamic range: 96 dB
  • THD (1 kHz): 0.005 %
  • Channel Separation (1 kHz): 92 dB
  • Dimensions: 17.2 x 5.3 x 17.2 in (43.6 x 13.4 x 43.6 cm)
  • Weight: 15.2 lbs (6.9 kg)

Included

  • Wireless remote control
  • 2 AA batteries
  • Audio connecting cable 
  • Instruction manual
  • Customer service instructions
  • Packing instructions
  • Onkyo’s 1-year warranty

Shipping

Estimated ship date is Mar 11, 2019 PT.

Payment will be collected at checkout. After this product run ends, orders will be submitted to the vendor up front, making all orders final.

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Recent Activity
Well you're touching on multiple things here; I agree most of us can't really hear a difference between FLAC and 320kbps mp3. Either we can't hear the difference, or we simply don't have good enough equipment to get the most out of FLAC. I personally rip my cd's to 320kbps and find that's good enough for music on my phone or in the car. At home, I do most of my listening on vinyl and the occasional CD. Again, maybe if I had a better DAC, and a better amp, and a better set of speakers. I've no idea. But even in my recording studio, listening on studio monitors (Yamaha HS8's w and wo subwoofer), I may be able to hear a difference, but sure as hell can't tell which is which nor which is better. Now, the other thing you mention is Spotify. Spotify is not even close to CD quality, or FLAC, or 320kbps MP3. Spotify free uses, normally, 112~128kbps on desktop and 96~128kbps on mobile. Premium gets up to 192kbbps in certain cases, which, is pretty good, I'd say. They're supposedly launching "Spotify HD" later this year. We'll see what that means exactly. But even with Spotify Premium, I still find it super hard to enjoy music through the service. Even if I download the music beforehand and select the highest bitrate possible; there's something they do to their source that kills dynamics. It's particularly bad in the car I've noticed (tested on a 2013 Mazda 3 and a 2021 Mazda 3). So, yeah, I agree, most people either can't hear or don't have good enough equipment to tell the difference between FLAC and a high quality MP3; but Spotify vs either CD, or FLAC or a high quality MP3 is a much lower bar. I'd say most modest setups will be good enough for you to hear a difference there. It may be tricky because volume is often different when you switch sources, but listen carefully, find an instrument in the mix and focus on it, cymbals are a good tell imo; they sound harsh and distorted in spotify; while, if they're not intended to, they won't on even a 196kbps mp3. IMHO the take away is that Spotify (and every other music streaming service as well) is a fantastic tool. It's a great music discovery platform that I believe has value to offer for everyone. But that's all it is. Just a tool. You discover music there, only to go to the musicians merch page (or amazon or discogs) and buy a record or a cd to listen to and rip to take on the go. I've paid for Spotify on multiple occasions. Every time they offer me the 3 months for the price of one deal. But I never end up using it any more than when I don't pay for it. It could also be linked to my age... I grew up listening to vinyl and recording vinyl on tapes to take with me. I was skeptical of CD's as a kid. Preferred the fun of buying a record and recording it onto tape. So maybe streaming just isn't for me.
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