Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

Onkyo DX-C390 6-Disk CD Changer w/ MP3 CD Playback

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Product Description
Though digital audio has come a long way, it’s hard to beat the crisp and clear sound of a CD. Packed with tons of modern features, the Onkyo DX-C390 six-disk CD changer will help you get the most from your music Read More

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blazer39
95
Feb 25, 2019
well some purest don't want any details lost in their music...so cd ripping is not an option they like to consider. also lots of people just prefer buying physical disks anyway rather than digital, so yeah i think this product still valid today.
(Edited)
It’s a better idea to just rip your CDs into your computer and save them on a 2-4gb external drive. Then you can play them as many times as you like with no spiral cd changer scratches.
I did that years ago and have never looked back. There's really no downside if you rip using a lossless codec. Every song I own is on a DLNA server in the house, a thumb drive in the car, and on my cell phone. Even if you have a ton of discs, it's not that burdensome since the ripping software automatically populates the metadata and saves the output in whatever folder hierarchy you specify. It might take a few evenings but then you'll never have to swap another disc again. It's a fantastic return on investment.
Moonsand1
473
Feb 23, 2019
This might be a good future investment. Vinyl is at an all time high, tapes are making a comeback. It is only a matter of time before hipsters make the CD cool again.
kirkandorules
12
Feb 23, 2019
In tyoolasjc 2019 we have a CD changer for sale
Matagalpa
10
Feb 23, 2019
The 80's called, they want their CD changer back...
Fergy
22
Feb 24, 2019
No they were popular in the 80s also I have had one since 1984
postwarscars
1090
Feb 25, 2019
They were niche until the 90's. They were extremely popular in the mid-90's and early 2000's, when the costs came down and before mp3s became more mainstream.
suquet.paul
27
Feb 23, 2019
Single-bit DAC. Unless you plan on plugging this via optical to your amplifier and having it (your amp or preamp) do the decoding using its internal DAC, I'd avoid CD players with not so good transport and terrible DACs. EDIT: As Stoppablemurph mentions, Onkyo does claim a muti-bit DAC (Wolfson WM8726). Indeed, I think they've updated this unit and now are finally using a decent DAC as opposed to a couple of years back.
(Edited)
VincentLeclerc
0
Mar 15, 2021
Thanks for sharing the information, is there really a difference between Spotify and CD talking about music quality? I don't think most of the people can tell the difference between uncompressed FLAC and 320k/bps MP3 songs. I used to download Spotify to MP3 and stream the same song on CD, I can barely hear difference.
suquet.paul
27
Mar 15, 2021
Well you're touching on multiple things here; I agree most of us can't really hear a difference between FLAC and 320kbps mp3. Either we can't hear the difference, or we simply don't have good enough equipment to get the most out of FLAC. I personally rip my cd's to 320kbps and find that's good enough for music on my phone or in the car. At home, I do most of my listening on vinyl and the occasional CD. Again, maybe if I had a better DAC, and a better amp, and a better set of speakers. I've no idea. But even in my recording studio, listening on studio monitors (Yamaha HS8's w and wo subwoofer), I may be able to hear a difference, but sure as hell can't tell which is which nor which is better. Now, the other thing you mention is Spotify. Spotify is not even close to CD quality, or FLAC, or 320kbps MP3. Spotify free uses, normally, 112~128kbps on desktop and 96~128kbps on mobile. Premium gets up to 192kbbps in certain cases, which, is pretty good, I'd say. They're supposedly launching "Spotify HD" later this year. We'll see what that means exactly. But even with Spotify Premium, I still find it super hard to enjoy music through the service. Even if I download the music beforehand and select the highest bitrate possible; there's something they do to their source that kills dynamics. It's particularly bad in the car I've noticed (tested on a 2013 Mazda 3 and a 2021 Mazda 3). So, yeah, I agree, most people either can't hear or don't have good enough equipment to tell the difference between FLAC and a high quality MP3; but Spotify vs either CD, or FLAC or a high quality MP3 is a much lower bar. I'd say most modest setups will be good enough for you to hear a difference there. It may be tricky because volume is often different when you switch sources, but listen carefully, find an instrument in the mix and focus on it, cymbals are a good tell imo; they sound harsh and distorted in spotify; while, if they're not intended to, they won't on even a 196kbps mp3. IMHO the take away is that Spotify (and every other music streaming service as well) is a fantastic tool. It's a great music discovery platform that I believe has value to offer for everyone. But that's all it is. Just a tool. You discover music there, only to go to the musicians merch page (or amazon or discogs) and buy a record or a cd to listen to and rip to take on the go. I've paid for Spotify on multiple occasions. Every time they offer me the 3 months for the price of one deal. But I never end up using it any more than when I don't pay for it. It could also be linked to my age... I grew up listening to vinyl and recording vinyl on tapes to take with me. I was skeptical of CD's as a kid. Preferred the fun of buying a record and recording it onto tape. So maybe streaming just isn't for me.
Recent Activity
Well you're touching on multiple things here; I agree most of us can't really hear a difference between FLAC and 320kbps mp3. Either we can't hear the difference, or we simply don't have good enough equipment to get the most out of FLAC. I personally rip my cd's to 320kbps and find that's good enough for music on my phone or in the car. At home, I do most of my listening on vinyl and the occasional CD. Again, maybe if I had a better DAC, and a better amp, and a better set of speakers. I've no idea. But even in my recording studio, listening on studio monitors (Yamaha HS8's w and wo subwoofer), I may be able to hear a difference, but sure as hell can't tell which is which nor which is better. Now, the other thing you mention is Spotify. Spotify is not even close to CD quality, or FLAC, or 320kbps MP3. Spotify free uses, normally, 112~128kbps on desktop and 96~128kbps on mobile. Premium gets up to 192kbbps in certain cases, which, is pretty good, I'd say. They're supposedly launching "Spotify HD" later this year. We'll see what that means exactly. But even with Spotify Premium, I still find it super hard to enjoy music through the service. Even if I download the music beforehand and select the highest bitrate possible; there's something they do to their source that kills dynamics. It's particularly bad in the car I've noticed (tested on a 2013 Mazda 3 and a 2021 Mazda 3). So, yeah, I agree, most people either can't hear or don't have good enough equipment to tell the difference between FLAC and a high quality MP3; but Spotify vs either CD, or FLAC or a high quality MP3 is a much lower bar. I'd say most modest setups will be good enough for you to hear a difference there. It may be tricky because volume is often different when you switch sources, but listen carefully, find an instrument in the mix and focus on it, cymbals are a good tell imo; they sound harsh and distorted in spotify; while, if they're not intended to, they won't on even a 196kbps mp3. IMHO the take away is that Spotify (and every other music streaming service as well) is a fantastic tool. It's a great music discovery platform that I believe has value to offer for everyone. But that's all it is. Just a tool. You discover music there, only to go to the musicians merch page (or amazon or discogs) and buy a record or a cd to listen to and rip to take on the go. I've paid for Spotify on multiple occasions. Every time they offer me the 3 months for the price of one deal. But I never end up using it any more than when I don't pay for it. It could also be linked to my age... I grew up listening to vinyl and recording vinyl on tapes to take with me. I was skeptical of CD's as a kid. Preferred the fun of buying a record and recording it onto tape. So maybe streaming just isn't for me.
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