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justin.hopkins
5
Aug 28, 2014
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Probably worth noting in the title (or the first paragraph, or anything before the final set of bullet points) that this is the resistive touch version of this item and NOT the capacitive.
Aug 28, 2014
lifeonadklein
127
Aug 28, 2014
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I'm unfamiliar with touchscreen systems, what's the difference?
Aug 28, 2014
pslocom
4
Aug 28, 2014
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Capacitive would be a screen like modern smart phones. They don't respond to typical stylus input or other pressure, but respond to your fingers and special stylus'. Resistive screens require pressure. Think old smart phones or things like the Nintendo DS/3DS. Pretty much anything can be used to interact with it, but you have to push down into the screen a bit.
Aug 28, 2014
andrew.b
261
Aug 28, 2014
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From Wikipedia: A resistive touchscreen panel comprises several layers, the most important of which are two thin, transparent electrically-resistive layers separated by a thin space. These layers face each other with a thin gap between. The top screen (the screen that is touched) has a coating on the underside surface of the screen. Just beneath it is a similar resistive layer on top of its substrate. One layer has conductive connections along its sides, the other along top and bottom. A voltage is applied to one layer, and sensed by the other. When an object, such as a fingertip or stylus tip, presses down onto the outer surface, the two layers touch to become connected at that point: The panel then behaves as a pair of voltage dividers, one axis at a time. By rapidly switching between each layer, the position of a pressure on the screen can be read.
Resistive touch is used in restaurants, factories and hospitals due to its high resistance to liquids and contaminants. A major benefit of resistive touch technology is its low cost. Additionally, as only sufficient pressure is necessary for the touch to be sensed, they may be used with gloves on, or by using anything rigid as a finger/stylus substitute. Disadvantages include the need to press down, and a risk of damage by sharp objects. Resistive touchscreens also suffer from poorer contrast, due to having additional reflections from the extra layers of material (separated by an air gap) placed over the screen
A capacitive touchscreen panel consists of an insulator such as glass, coated with a transparent conductor such as indium tin oxide (ITO). As the human body is also an electrical conductor, touching the surface of the screen results in a distortion of the screen's electrostatic field, measurable as a change in capacitance. Different technologies may be used to determine the location of the touch. The location is then sent to the controller for processing.
Unlike a resistive touchscreen, one cannot use a capacitive touchscreen through most types of electrically insulating material, such as gloves. This disadvantage especially affects usability in consumer electronics, such as touch tablet PCs and capacitive smartphones in cold weather. It can be overcome with a special capacitive stylus, or a special-application glove with an embroidered patch of conductive thread passing through it and contacting the user's fingertip.
Aug 28, 2014
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