Powertac Warrior G4 4,200-Lumen Tactical Flashlight
Powertac Warrior G4 4,200-Lumen Tactical Flashlight
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Product Description
The fourth-generation release from Powertac’s renowned Warrior flashlight series, the Warrior G4 lives up to its name, and then some. Boasting improved illumination and more durability than its predecessors, the G4 is made from aircraft-grade aluminum with a textured type-III finish for extra grip Read More

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MDL5
18
May 17, 2020
The Candela is just a little over 11,000. That is not much. If you do not understand what Candela is or how Lumens and Candela relate to each other in terms of brightness and throw, you should get schooled on it, because there are a ton of flashlights out there, this being one of them where it boasts a super high Lumen output but the Candela is so low, it doesn’t matter whether it was 4200 Lumens or 10,000 lumens. Olight has a light called the Warrior X Pro. It’s highest output is 2,250 Lumens but it has 90,000 Candela. Last night while my family pulled into the parking lot of my office to pick me up, I shined the WarriorXPro full power at them when they were about 250-300 feet away and it blasted them so hard they had to immediately stop dead in their tracks!! They said they were so instantly and completely blinded that they couldn’t even tell where the light was coming from or make out anything around them. I was impressed to say the least! This PowerTac at a little over 11,000 Candela could never pull that off! So what about how bright the PowerTac would be at a super close range? Well, we would have to try that out and see. It could be super bright. It might be super dumb and not very bright at all. The features in the PowerTac like immediate strobe is great for defense. Most flashlights that have a strobe feature require you to hold down buttons for sometimes up to 3 seconds. Not so good for immediate personal defense against bad guys which makes the strobes pretty useless unless it’s being used for a different application etc bla bla.. As far as the 4200 Lumens only lasting for a minute or two.. If you’re using it for a personal defense light then a couple minutes is fine. If it then bumps down to 1430 Lumens and stays there for quite a while, that’s a good amount of solid usable workable light. Again Candela Candela Candela! 😬 Now, all that hot air said, if the Candela were say 40,000 or higher, I would immediately buy this light right now! Maybe even two of them! Just my humble opinions! 👍🏼
RayF
23760
May 21, 2020
Heard the kids are recovering nicely...
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(Edited)
MDL5
18
May 23, 2020
BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!
dxace1
3
May 17, 2020
Someone should really contact Drop and tell them there's a bit of deceptive advertising with this 4300 claim
DukeJockey
69
May 16, 2020
4200 lumens for less than a minute, I’m sure. Look at the run times for 4200 and 1430 lumens: they’re both 1.23 hours. You get a brief blast at 4200 lumens, then it steps down to 1430 until it cools off and you reboot it. The question is whether the step down is temperature based or just a simple timer. If it’s thermal protected, you could keep a handful of “unloaded” lights in a cooler packed with dry ice. Grab one, pop in a nice warm cell (fresh from the charger), fire until step down. Grab the next chilly one, reload, and keep going. With enough lights and solid phase CO2 you could keep this up for a while. Replace the dry ice with liquid phase nitrogen to get longer cycle times. Liquid helium might actually achieve superconductivity (note to self: find out if LEDs work at 2 degrees absolute). Most flashlight manufacturers use this disingenuous ploy to gain market advantage in the Great Flashlight Lumens war (see also the Great Camera Megapixel war). It’s much easier to burn out a few LEDs to find out how much and how long you can overdrive them before stepping down than it is to build a pocketable light that will deliver 4200 lumens as long as the battery holds out. I’ll grant them that 1430 lumens for over an hour in a single 18650 cell light is good. Really good. I’d grab one now if I didn’t already have a 1000 lumen Nitecore P12GT. I usually wait for a doubling in output (1 photographic “stop”) before upgrading. I guess I told that story to suggest that our VAR (aka Drop) explicitly state turbo step down times and methods (timed or temperature) instead of just regurgitating the manufacturer’s marketing copy.
djozz
16
May 16, 2020
Looks like a nice flashlight. Is the charging USB-C? Looks like micro-USB to me, which is in general a bit less durable and, in my country at least, soon sort of obsolete.
Phasmainmachina
33
May 16, 2020
It’s hardly going to be obsolete, at least for just charging electronic devices which don’t require data; there must be hundreds of millions of micro-USB powered devices around. The only advantage of using USB-C for a flashlight is not having to worry which way round the plug goes in! Durability? You’re not going to be plugging the thing in every night like you would a phone, more likely every few days, and it’s more likely the plug/cable that’ll go, and those are like weeds, practically free and everywhere. I’m speaking from some experience with flashlights like this one, I’ve got a Powertac E9R-G4, and it’s superb, really easy to use and charge, and that’s where the micro-USB plug becomes even less of an issue, because you’ll almost never bother to use it! What you’ll use is the magnetic connector on the side of the flashlight, the micro-USB socket is underneath that, with a water-resistant rubber cover sealing it off. The ONLY time you might need to charge using the micro-USB socket is if you’re away somewhere and left the magnetic connector at home, otherwise, it’s a non-issue.
djozz
16
May 16, 2020
The mention of obsolence was about my own country as I stated. And of course I have many micro-USB cables laying around still, but the ones that are ready to use are USB-C. I agree that with the magnetic charger in place, the USB port gets less abuse. I have a seen several micro-USB sockets in fashlights break off in regular use, it is a real issue! But I guess those sockets come in different qualities, so that does neccessarily have to become a problem here.
NC_Ellis
2
May 16, 2020
I hope this brand gets more recognition. I met a few of the employees and CEO at a firearms show 15 years ago and I have been a customer ever since. Company based in NC, no hassle lifetime warranty Never had to use it and I own 9 different lights from PowerTac starting back 15 years ago including the Warrior Gen 1, 2 and 3). Lumens hold up to claim, super bright and they are crafted extremely well. Well worth the investment if you are looking for a great flashlight.
YuDodis
14
May 16, 2020
That's what I was looking for. Thanks.
TheOtherWatcher
15
May 16, 2020
Here's what's interesting to me. I called Powertac as I'm based in Greensboro NC and asked if their E9R-G4 had a stepdown. The stats on their website for it claim 2550 lumens for 2.02 hours, mentioning nothing about a stepdown to relieve heat. The cust rep I spoke with checked with his "engineers" who claimed that there's no stepdown. But videos with product tests found on Youtube claim a stepdown of a few minutes, and any light that hot HAS to have one. Sumpin' fishy.
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