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Kados
248
Nov 5, 2019
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Note for those who care. This is technically a frame lock. It has dual scales but the part that moves in behind the blade is part of the structural frame, not a seperate piece of punched metal. Not quite sure why MD keeps labeling frame locks as liner locks just because the lockup is covered with a scale, rather than being exposed. The Brad Zinker Dogtooth, Ferrum Forge Gent, All the Eric Ochs knives, and several others (basically every dual scale MD colab) are also frame locks, despite being listed as liners. Another easy way to tell if a knife is a liner or frame (some knifes like the Eric Ochs do not provide images of the lock up) is to look at what the lock is made of. If it lists the lock as being made from Ti, then it is 100% a frame lock. True liner locks cannot be made from Ti as it is too soft a metal to hold up. Frame locks can get away with it as it is a much thicker piece of CNC milled metal, compared to a thin stamped sheet. They also commonly will add a small piece of hardened steel to the end of the frame for added wear resistance.
(Edited)
Nov 5, 2019
ecoleman
693
Nov 5, 2019
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There are two versions of the Dogtooth, a frame lock and a liner lock.
Nov 5, 2019
Kavik
4801
Nov 5, 2019
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Eh, it's all just semantics and ultimately doesn't really matter as long as whatever is used as a lockbar is thick enough to do its job. I'd look at this knife and say it is a liner lock, because the stainless "liner" is thinner than the "scales". Also, the "liners" are fully covered when looking at the face of the handle. Additionally, I'm betting you put it all together and all screws go on from the outside. In other words, you can't assemble and use this without the handle material in place. This, IMO, would be the most important distinction. Whereas the Gent, i would agree, is a frame lock with exterior scales. The G10 is thinner than the metal. It doesn't add any rigidity to the structure. The G10 doesn't fully cover the face of the handle. Most importantly, the knife is functional with the scales removed. You assemble the frame and have a perfectly functional knife, then add scales for looks/comfort (or call it a hybrid, if you want to be picky about the scales being integral to the locking system as an overtravel stop) The 2 key things, imo, are: 1) can the knife be assembled and used without the scales (then framelock with scales) 2) or are the scales required for the structure/rigidity of the handle (then linerlock) Again though, is it worth worrying about? I mean, "a rose by any other name...", right?
Nov 5, 2019
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