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TiffanyPoodleslide
1326
May 2, 2018
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So my question; What's the handle colour choice? I mean, I can certainly use the serrated version in and out of the barn, but I can't decide if the handle colour ends up being black if one chooses serrated or what? I really like the titanium coloured handle, visually.
No remarks about the colour of the scales.
May 2, 2018
lobster
678
May 3, 2018
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For this knife, there are no handle color choices, the handle is the same on both models--black g10 on one side and full titanium on the other side. If you prefer titanium on both sides, there are many other knifes that offer this option. What I personally find interesting about this knife, and why I've joined, is this is a relatively small brand compared to other big hitters these days, but I have a raid ops spinner in titanium and I can see the machining is top notch. This knife is super thick as well--meaning the handle slabs are very thick and chunky. check out this review and look at how thick the handles are: http://hardcorecampingtools.blogspot.com/2018/04/raidops-preliminary-review-of-raidops.html
May 3, 2018
TiffanyPoodleslide
1326
May 3, 2018
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Oh, the colour isn't really a deal breaker. It's really about build quality and function for me, and this beefy knife caught my attention, especially as it offers a serration, which I find invaluable around the farm. So I've joined the drop. The Black/Titanium scales actually sounds appealing.
May 3, 2018
Axeguy
1262
May 6, 2018
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I’m with you there. I love serrations on a work knife and there aren’t enough offered in these drops. I pretty much jumped when I saw serrations and the 5mm blade thickness. Cheers!
May 6, 2018
Axeguy
1262
May 6, 2018
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Thank you for that blog/review. It seems to have similar dimensions all-around to another chunky icon: the DPX H.E.S.T. folder—an old fave
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5mm slab of Niolox (think superclean, fine-grained tool steel). Here’s where we will differ: with proper care and attention, Ti / bladesteel interfaces can work very well. Snug fit/angles and perhaps carbidizing the Ti lockbar face BUT in a properly engineered interface, most of the force is compression and wearing down is insignificant.
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Three plus years of beating on this thing and it is rock solid. I suspect a steel insert is a good way of preventing failure if your tolerances are perhaps a little larger. Otherwise you are just overbuilding the thing or even playing on peoples’ fears. I am not saying that it isn’t a positive thing, but that—with proper engineering—the lockbar insert is not necessarily...necessary...
May 6, 2018
lobster
678
May 6, 2018
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I agree, the lock bar insert is a means of simplifying the production and waranty service for mass produced frame locks. When done right, a carburized Ti lock face against the hardened steel blade does not wear much after an initial break in period. I’ve read terzolas book on designing proper liner locks and while lock bar inserts came later and seem like an added manufacturing step, I think they really serve the main purpose of addressing the main points discovered by Michael walker and taught to terzola: 1. The angle of the blade / lock inerface is critical, 2. The blade and ti lock faces need to be finished properly: the blade must be polished to 300-600grit to avoid grindinag away the softer Ti with repeated opening, and ti can be brought closer to the hardness of the steel by selecting the right alloy and carburizing the surface. If the angles are correct then the end result is that with repeated cycle, the Ti gets compressed and work hardened while avoiding lock stick. lock bar inserts allow the manufacturer to spend less time carburizing, grinding the correct angles into the tI face, and lessen the number of knives sent back for the issue of lock stick.
May 6, 2018
Axeguy
1262
May 6, 2018
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Thank you very much for that well-worded explanation (and for another book to read)! It seems the proper explanations get watered down and passed around until the lockbar insert becomes a sign of quality, whereas it is just one way of solving a problem and not necessarily a criticism of makers not doing it. We hear it all the time...”for that kind of money, i’d need a lockbar insert, etc.” We have to look closely at each design and know something of the work a maker is putting into a piece before being critical. I remember all the flak Spyderco, for one, was taking for not doing it. Thanks again @lobster.
May 6, 2018
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