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NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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can I ask how hard is it to solder the switches? I'm a complete noob to this but I really want a nice keyboard to invest in.
Sep 19, 2016
Munnybear
259
Sep 19, 2016
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I asked the same question when the white-fox keyboard drop came out. Ended up getting it assembled… few months down the track, I would now prefer the kit instead (customize my own switches etc). Just practice on a number pad or something before you assemble this more expansive keyboard. If you like brown switch, definitely try zealios (hard to buy).
Sep 19, 2016
genkidama
37
Sep 19, 2016
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I would also advice to try it out on some other board or something like that. I think a soldering kit is not that expensive and if you have someone in your family or friends who can solder stuff, ask them to show you or watch some good youtube tutorials and I think after some time you'll get the handle of it.
I bet if you are unsure doing the soldering yourself there is a shop nearby that can solder it for you.
Sep 19, 2016
NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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thanks! I really liked the white fox keyboard before but since its gone now I gotta find something else. I'm still deciding whether to get this or not... Also I do plan on using clear switches
Sep 19, 2016
NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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Though i never owned a mechanical keyboard before (*gasp*), so im wondering starting right away with soldering and customizing would be too much for me.
Sep 19, 2016
CJD-Anthony
35
Sep 19, 2016
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As long as you have a soldering iron that can stay at a constant 350-400 degrees, you'll be fine. I suggest not taking the risk of using $15-20 soldering irons as they have no adjustable temperature and can vary immensely, and in some case, reach temperatures high enough to destroy parts of the PCB
Sep 19, 2016
genkidama
37
Sep 19, 2016
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I would recommend to try some switches if possible. As there is hype for Gateron Clears or Zealios Switches and stuff. But maybe it's just not right for you. A lot of ppl recommended me MX Red or MX Blue as I game and write a lot, but I stuck with MX Browns and I love them as they are described as the "best switch" coming from a non-mech board. Now I'm thinking about getting into MX Blues and stuff, but as I want to try and use this board at my workspace I rather go with Browns and maybe some O-rings and try Blues and other switches at a later point of time.
I'm just encouraging to try some out, if you haven't invested much time into researching all the different switches that are available (and there are quite a lot I might say ^^ phew :D)
Sep 19, 2016
Munnybear
259
Sep 19, 2016
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If you like clear(55g if I m not mistaken), which is simply a heavier brown(45g), there's a good chance you will like zealio (67/80g). If money is not too much of a concern, buy this kit (it will take awhile before you get it) and go buy a ducky/filco (not overly expansive but decent brands) in store for now. Later on, you can have 1 for home and 1 for work. 🙂
Sep 19, 2016
NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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ok got it! i'll probably invest in something better than what i have now, its pretty old and crappy.
Sep 19, 2016
NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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ok, thanks for the suggestion! I'll drop by at some keyboard store hopefully before this drop ends lol. Perhaps I should wait for another kit to come along? I'm trying to find something like 68 keyboard and since most of them are kits this whole soldering thing will come into use.
Sep 19, 2016
NLin
0
Sep 19, 2016
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I'm looking to spend a little more on one keyboard that I can use everything for, home and work/school. RN im a broke ass student... Though thank you i'll definitely look into the cherry alternative switches :)
Sep 19, 2016
mindfuneral
64
Sep 19, 2016
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Hey man, if you're a student (college, I'm assuming?), I suggest finding your electrical engineering building, computer engineering building or maybe a robotics club on campus and ask if someone will sit down and help you with their soldering iron. I know that may sound weird, but most people who are passionate about their hobby (or course of study) would be more than happy to let you use their equipment and show you how it's done (and they usually have the good equipment). Keyboard soldering is very easy compared to other soldering jobs, so most people who are into electronics of any kind should have no problem helping even if they've never specifically soldered a keyboard before. Just make sure the iron is set around 375°F and use rosin/resin core solder around 0.02" diameter. Make sure use flux on each pad too before soldering.
Sep 19, 2016
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