SharpEdge Kuro-Uchi Utility Knife
SharpEdge Kuro-Uchi Utility Knife
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37 Sold
Product Description
Whether you use it as your main knife or as an edge for smaller jobs, the SharpEdge Kuro-Ichi can handle a variety of tasks—from slicing poultry and chopping vegetables to creating garnishes and separating seeds. Fitted with an octagonal shaped handle made of Japanese walnut wood, the Kuro-Ichi offers a secure grip for both righties and lefties Read More

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kjs3
2
Nov 27, 2019
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Received the knife. I'm quite pleased. There are certainly higher-end knives of this type (at predictably higher price), but this one looks to be well made, functional and a good value. Bonus, it was for a gift, and it came quite nicely packaged/presented. Recipient thinks it's very nice.
Nov 27, 2019
schreib
17
Oct 30, 2019
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Is this knife a double bevel angle edge or single bevel? In either case what is the angle of grind for regrinding? Finally, WHY in the specs for this valuable knife is this not addressed? This is very important to keeping a knife sharp.
Oct 30, 2019
kjs3
2
Nov 27, 2019
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Weeeeeeel....not sure I agree it's hard to ruin a knife (or at least render it ineffective) with a botched sharpening (especially certain steel compositions), but completely agree it's something a little patience and a Youtube video or two will have you mastering in no time. You're definitely right it's something to just relax and learn.
Nov 27, 2019
Dermott
239
Nov 27, 2019
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"Ruin," to me, implies it can't be fixed. That's the great thing about sharpening: sure, you might dull the knife. But if you're sharpening it, it's because it was dull. As long as the knife cuts better'n it did when you started sharpening, you're making progress. You can work at it a little over time. No need to stress over it.
Nov 27, 2019
Dermott
239
Oct 25, 2019
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Pictures show an octagonal handle. Text indicates D-shape. Can we get confirmation of which handle shape is actually going to ship?
Oct 25, 2019
sharpedge
193
SharpEdge
Oct 28, 2019
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Hi @Dermott, Grega here from SharpEdge, thanks for finding a typo in the copy! I can confirm the handle is octagonal shape, I'll reach out to Drop to correct it ASAP. Thanks again! cc @Kavik
Oct 28, 2019
kstokley
1031
Buying Manager
Oct 29, 2019
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Thanks for catching that! You are right, it is an octagonal handle. The copy has been updated.
Oct 29, 2019
Charlesgpr
91
Oct 25, 2019
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I just bought the petty knife drop because I absolutely love my bunka. I know SharpEdge is very responsive here so I'll ask; what are the main differences in steel performance and shape? Should I buy this one and gift the Petty to someone this Christmas? Thanks!
Oct 25, 2019
sharpedge
193
SharpEdge
Oct 28, 2019
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Hi Charles, Grega here from SharpEdge, thank you for your purchases and your question. The two steels are quite different. ZDP-189 steel is member of the powder steel family, SUJ-2 is member of the high-carbon steel family. Both have their pros and cons, some prefer one to the other - there are personal preferences. ZDP-189 steel is one of the hardest steels available for kitchen knife production (HRC levels of 65-67 HRC), which means a very, VERY long edge retention. For its hardness it is not as difficult to resharpen as one would expect, but this also depends on who heat treated the knives. Yoshida Hamono, the blacksmith who makes ZDP-189 Bunka Black and Petty Black, does this job very well. ZDP-189 steel also contains high amounts (aprox 20%) of chromium (Cr), which means it is pretty much stainless. SUJ-2 steel is a high-carbon steel - these steels are preferred choice of Japanese sushi chefs (and nowadays many other chefs) for their very smooth/fine sharpness (which helps keeping the raw food fresh longer), ease of sharpening and very high hardness level (61-64 HRC). This particular Kuro-uchi Utility was heat treated to around 63-64 HRC. They do need more maintenance since they are not stainless - they will develop patina and if not maintained well (washed and wiped dry after every use and oiled regularly), start corroding. Some users prefer to have patina on their knife as every blade gets a unique pattern, and they dont mind the extra work maintaining the knife for all the benefits high-carbon knives deliver. It really depends on your personal preferences. You are welcome to experiment with this knife and see if you like the steel. Since you like the Bunka you will probably also like the Petty. This one is different, but we like it very much. An inexpensive knife for its performance, and the length and the shape is very useful to use in the kitchen. I hope this helps a bit, and if you have any further questions, Im happy to help! Best, Grega
Oct 28, 2019