Showing 1 of 4 conversations about:
schreib
17
Oct 30, 2019
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Is this knife a double bevel angle edge or single bevel? In either case what is the angle of grind for regrinding? Finally, WHY in the specs for this valuable knife is this not addressed? This is very important to keeping a knife sharp.
Oct 30, 2019
Dermott
239
Oct 31, 2019
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This is a utility/petty knife. It's double-bevel. > Why isn't this addressed Addressing any of those questions in text or specs on knives is pretty unusual. The folks who care about the answer already have, in most cases, preferences and opinions on the topic, and will resharpen to their desired angle. It's not terribly important to keeping a knife sharp. You can set whatever bevel you prefer, as long as you're consistent.
Oct 31, 2019
schreib
17
Nov 1, 2019
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thanks. I just figured one should try to stick to the knife maker's design for the knife bevel to get the most out of it. But. I am NOT a pro and am getting the drift here that, like you say, it actually is NOT important because folks have their own sharpening "system" and make any knife they buy adhere to that by re-"turning" a new knife to use the angle etc they have found to work best for them. . . thanks again.
Nov 1, 2019
Dermott
239
Nov 1, 2019
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No worries. And, especially if you're new to knife sharpening, don't be nervous about it. You're not going to ruin a knife by sharpening it, unless you're doing something really crazy. You'll probably know if you're doing something crazy. Get you a good, cheap, medium grit stone, watch a couple videos (the SharpEdge or Japanese Knife Imports ones are good), and hack away until you get it. You'll be push cutting newspaper and skimming the top off grapes in no time.
Nov 1, 2019
kjs3
2
Nov 27, 2019
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Weeeeeeel....not sure I agree it's hard to ruin a knife (or at least render it ineffective) with a botched sharpening (especially certain steel compositions), but completely agree it's something a little patience and a Youtube video or two will have you mastering in no time. You're definitely right it's something to just relax and learn.
Nov 27, 2019
Dermott
239
Nov 27, 2019
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"Ruin," to me, implies it can't be fixed. That's the great thing about sharpening: sure, you might dull the knife. But if you're sharpening it, it's because it was dull. As long as the knife cuts better'n it did when you started sharpening, you're making progress. You can work at it a little over time. No need to stress over it.
Nov 27, 2019
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