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Shovlbum
0
May 2, 2016
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I must have bad chip-amp karma. Bought a Lepai 2020+ off of A***** a while back and after a couple weeks the left channel went out. So I bought this one on the last drop, didn't set it up for a couple of weeks, but when I did I found that it just cuts out at random intervals. Double-checked all connections, headphone out works fine, volume level low to moderate, It just plain stops randomly. Same set up I use with my vintage receiver which is only 20w per channel BTW. All I did was connect this amp to the source and speakers. Just wanted something smaller. Build quality seems decent, and when it IS playing it sounds fine. If they agree to replace it I now have to pay for return shipping and gamble again. Lesson learned: Set it up and try it right away.
May 2, 2016
Gimmediscount
4
May 16, 2016
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I am experiencing the same issue. I have tried every troubleshooting step I could think of to prevent the sound from cutting off. This problem does not happen with another vintage amp (also 20W p/ channel) that I've tested. Now I can't get any sound to play through the speakers (only through the separate headphone amp/jack). My guess is that the amp died. Another explanation I heard was that my speakers were being fed too much power, thus cutting the sound off to prevent speaker damage/clipping.
It is probably too late to return the amp at this point. Email seems to be the only point of contact at the time of this writing. It was great while it lasted.
May 16, 2016
Striker579
30
May 20, 2016
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Hello, I have some advice for you. If you can not return your unit for a new working one, try replacing the power brick and cord. Sound cutting out is normally the amp not having enough power to push out the volume (watts) you are requesting through the knob. So if your brick is working at a diminished capacity it could be too weak to power passive speakers at 20W each but could be limping along with enough to run your 2W headphone jack. As a side note running too much power to a speaker will cause audible distortion as the driver fails to produce the proper sounds at higher than rated wattages. This SMSL SA-160 will NOT "clip" to prevent speaker damage so beware.
May 20, 2016
gm0n13
40
May 24, 2016
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Hey, just a little info that may be helpful. Clipping in audio amplification is not some kind of speaker protection. It's a wave form distortion caused by over driving an amplifier. That is, requesting an amp to put out more power than it is capable of producing. The amp can't keep up and distorts. It's the most common cause of blowing speaker drivers. Dirty power is a speaker killer. Here's a wiki article that will explain better. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipping_(audio) The reason (most likely) that the headphone amp is working and the speaker output is not is that they're completely different amps. The speakers use a class d chip amp circuitry and the headphones operate off a separate op amp. After using this amp for hours daily my best guess for why the speaker amp circuitry would blow is most likely one of two things: 1. The amp was defective from the jump, or, 2. The speaker wires had too long of tails and came into contact with each other and shorted the amp. The back of this amp is very crowded. If you didn't use banana plugs to plug into the center of the speaker jacks you have to be extra careful. When stripping the speaker wire and using the screw down function of the jack, the stripped wire CAN NOT hang out (any at all) from beneath the screw down, on the cut end or the insulated speaker side. If it does and the tail of the L speaker wire comes into contact with the R speaker wire or both are in contact with the amp body (case) you'll short out the amp. Also if you wrapped the speaker around the metal stud post instead of passing it through the hole in the center of the stud post you're more likely to have stray wires from the strand sticking out and making a short. Good luck.
May 24, 2016
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