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A community member
Oct 17, 2018
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One can "make" a campfire stove from a charcoal starter (similar size) for peanuts (I have) that burn dead fall nearly as well, but in stainless steel w/pot/pan stand the Solo stove Campfire is certainly more attractive and durable. $85 instead of reg $110 (not the misleading suggested list of $150)? Maybe. I was hoping for a bit less than this but don't we always? Charcoal starters are usually $8-20 and one can drill more holes below top rim and set a 10 1/4" cast iron pan (et al) perfectly on top. If one likes and often uses small campfires for heat, some cooking, and outdoors ambiance, then this Solo Stove might be for you. These fire canisters are very good at reducing irritating smoke and clean up.
Oct 17, 2018
KWHa10
13
Jan 1, 2019
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There are plenty of generic ones out there for under $20. It's basically just a hobo stove.
Jan 1, 2019
It's only misleading if you don't know what MSRP is nor check the manufacturers website to confirm that 149.99 IS the MSRP.
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Mar 21, 2019
I agree that $149.99 is the MSRP. What's kind of misleading though is that solostove.com never (that I've seen) charges $149.99. In the past two or three years that I've occasionally visited the site, it's always been $109.99 marked down from $149.99. It seems to be on perpetual sale. (A marketing gimmick?) Perhaps they charged full MSRP when it first came out? So, even though $149.99 is the MSRP (because it's theirs to set), I tend to think of $109.99 as being the "regular" price (because that's what they regularly charge). :)
(Edited)
Mar 21, 2019
MSRP is not list price/original price... now if they claimed it as a list/original price they would have to have had sold it for that or it would be false advertising. This is what Kohls was found guilty of, they were trying to claim things were sales when it was there list or standard price. Saying your price is 43% below MSRP is saying that you are selling it for 43% less than the manufacturer recommends. Nothing more, nothing less.
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Mar 21, 2019
A community member
Mar 22, 2019
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Yes, technically $150 is MSRP. But $110 is the effective "street price" and that is, imo, the best way to see what the Massdrop discount price saves members.
Mar 22, 2019
A community member
Mar 22, 2019
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And I do check manufactures list, I understand MSRP, and also what average discounted retail street prices are as do most Massdrop members.
Mar 22, 2019
So you expect Massdrop to post the regular/sales prices of other websites so you don't have to do any research? The don't have a "regular" price that they sell things at so the only reference they can factually make is MSRP. It's apparent the posters in this thread expect Massdrop to do something that no other retailer in the world does... good luck with that.
Mar 22, 2019
A community member
Mar 22, 2019
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Uh... I. and others did/do research before we purchase to make our product value judgments. MSRP is merely marketing, that's all. The first two letters of MSRP stand for manufacturers-suggested, a meaningless number for consumers to use for comparison. What a retailer sells at is based upon their individual wholesale agreement with a company. These agreements normally include a "can't advertise lower than" with various exceptions for some types of sales or Black Fridays. If a product usually sells for an average price across dealers - including a companies direct website where they also advertise MSRP- then the usual price is the figure consumers should use to calculate value. This gives a percentage savings over the lower street price vs. MSRP. I'm not saying that S.Stove is intentionally or exceptionally attempting to mislead, only in the sense that most companies use this marketing fiction to help a consumer convince him/herself that they're getting more of a discount and better deal.
Mar 22, 2019
So if you know what MSRP is and you did your research why was it worth mentioning in the first place? The misunderstanding of this concept was so rampant at one point they created a dedicated FAQ for it. MSRP is just a marketing tactic, of which you see 200+ a day, why bring it into discussion about a product? Amazon's list price and current price often differ because of their dynamic pricing but they still reference the original list price. This is common every day retail behavior. Massdrop needs a factual number to reference and uses MSRP because "sales" here are rare.
Mar 23, 2019
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