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plexus
52
Apr 29, 2017
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I have a Vorso Mk1 Cu/Ruby, Mk1 SS/Ceramic and Lambda/Ruby. I get longer spin times with the Copper, tonight achieving my longest of 14 minutes 32 seconds. With the SS the max I have been able to get is around 11:30. On average I get: Copper 9-12 mins, SS 7-11 mins and the Lambda is 7-10 mins. I think that it has more to do with the mass of the top, its geometry and less to do with the bearing, although I have no data to back this up. I get longer times with the Copper but its harder to spin than the SS or Lambda. The SS is a good comprimise. Once I got better I could get better times with the Copper. Weights: Copper 44.83g, SS 39.61g, Lambda 34.59g
Apr 29, 2017
DenisB
107
May 5, 2017
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My experience is totally different. I wanted to see if there was a noticeable influence of mass on spin time. I have 3 Vorso tops: copper (bought here on the first campaign), brass and stainless steel, all with the same ceramic ball. I bought them because I consider the Vorsos (and Lambdas) as the best tops and as a widely available, reasonably priced reference. After my standard series of tests (details on my Etsy profile page: https://www.etsy.com/people/DenisParis?ref=pr_profile), the difference appears to be only a few seconds (and absolutely not meaningful, considering random variations of spin time in different tries). Theoretically, the energy that can be transferred to a top is proportional to its mass (within some limits in relation with the strength in the fingers and the relative weight of the spindle). The energy lost by friction at the tip is also proportional to mass (and to spin time, but not to rotational velocity). I think friction due to air can be neglected. Therefore, still within some limits, mass should have no direct influence in and of itself on spin time. I see several ways of understanding your results: 1) tops are more or less well balanced; an infinitesimal variation in balance can have much stronger effects on spin time than a variation in mass 2) statistics may be misleading: if you didn't try the different tops the same number of times in the same conditions, an exceptionally long spin time can appear. But I don't understand your large difference in average times for copper and SS. What I don't understand also is why copper should be harder to spin than SS (the design is exactly the same and the mass difference is only 5 grams).
May 5, 2017
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