Showing 1 of 19 conversations about:
OrCohen
199
Oct 1, 2017
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Would it last forever being stainless steel?
Oct 1, 2017
OrCohen
199
Oct 1, 2017
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Also, how does it compare to cast iron in terms of heat retention?
Oct 1, 2017
KingGhidorah
52
Dec 1, 2017
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Hey OrCohen, not an expert but here's what I know: Won't last forever, but can last many lifetimes if cared for. Simple care is making sure it is washed in warm soapy water, then dried , by hand and not in the dishwasher. Don't shock in cold water after use, but let it cool slowly. The 5 ply is a good guard against warping due to the extra thickness/durability of extra layers. I also believe that Cast iron will have better heat retention than this pan, although I haven't directly compared the two. There are, however, different benefits to each pan though so those are worth looking into and making sure that you are covering your own specific needs. From what I've seen, Viking as a brand has a solid reputation of good pots and pans [Their ovens and ranges on the other hand are another story].
Like I said, not an expert, so anyone can feel free to correct me where I'm wrong.
Dec 1, 2017
VikingCulinary
38
Viking Culinary
Dec 1, 2017
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We think you covered it very well! Thank you. The tip about not shocking the pan is super important. A fast temperature change can warp the pan. Always let your Stainless pans cool naturally.
Dec 1, 2017
SidPost
70
Dec 1, 2017
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Quality stainless steel pans like this one have very long lifespans and take pretty harsh treatment to actually be 'destroyed'. I have Demeyere Proline *5 skillets that I expect to use until I see a grave and they get passed down to my heirs who will use them until they see a grave too.
Dec 1, 2017
SidPost
70
Dec 1, 2017
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Lodge cast iron will have more total heat retention. Quality stainless like this is worlds ahead of aluminum and average big box store stainless. Unless you are using a really weak stove, there will be enough heat retention to sear a steak really well along with most other similar cooking techniques.
Dec 1, 2017
RayF
16213
Nov 21, 2018
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Longer than you!
Nov 21, 2018
RayF
16213
Nov 21, 2018
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Disagree! Where searing a steak is concerned, retention isn't the issue, conductivity is. How quickly a pan takes to reach searing temp is conductivity, how long it stays at that temp depends on how long it stays in contact with the heat source. On the other hand, once heated and then removed from a heat source, a cast iron pan will retain heat longer. While that's not important when searing a steak, heat retention does have a function in other recipes.
Nov 21, 2018
SidPost
70
Nov 21, 2018
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Thermal capacity is important if you are using a weak 'apartment stove'. Sure, a nice 30K BTU cooktop in a nice home can sear in almost any pan. Thermal capacity with a long heat up time let me sear a steak where I would have otherwise essentially braised (or steamed) it to whatever 'done-ness' I wanted. Don't beleive me, take a cast iron skillet and put it on a cheap $10 electric burner from overseas. Will this same cheap electric coil cook reasonably in 5 minutes in an aluminum everyday skillet from overseas? Now, let that heavy cast iron sit on the same pathetic heat source for an hour or two. Do water drops dance and does it let your steak get a sear? I didn't like steamed steaks in that old apartment so, in the oven with the cast iron, out onto the electric coil at 'max' and in the steak went. Instead of a generic grey piece of meat, I could get a descent sear with enough crust to make me happy. I could go on about hamburgers too however, I don't want to offend people who think a steamed burger is wonderful. I'm not one of them so, again, getting some crust on a burger patty made the meal infinitely more enjoyable to "me".
Nov 21, 2018
SidPost
70
Nov 21, 2018
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And yes, heat transfer (conductivity) is what you want in your cookware if you have a good heat source. Low thermal capacity (heat retention) lets you take the heat away if you are too hot (close to burning something). Thick aluminum with omlettes for example is a really nice experience for me. Stainless steel works well (along with iron pans) for searing and cooking in general with a good heat source, in my experience. French and Belgian copper cookware is really nice if you can live with the requirements it has (not melting the tin, polishing, etc.). Cookware options, heat sources and, the meals in question should all be considered in your choice of cookware for any given meal.
Nov 21, 2018
RayF
16213
Nov 22, 2018
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I believe I see your issue now. Not to worry, I'm sending you one of these for Xmas!
search
Read all about it here: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/500000-dollar-la-cornue-thermador-bertazzoni-oven
Nov 22, 2018
SidPost
70
Nov 22, 2018
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La Cornue and similar French stoves sure are nice! England has a few nice ones in cast iron and, the Italians have their fair share of great choices too. The EU in general has a lot of great options which is where I learned to love Induction cooktops. Some day I hope I get to cook on a classic French Top stove.
Nov 22, 2018
RayF
16213
Nov 22, 2018
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Invite us for dinner when you do!
Nov 22, 2018
SidPost
70
Nov 22, 2018
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:-) Happy Thanksgiving!
Nov 22, 2018
RayF
16213
Nov 23, 2018
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You too my friend!
Nov 23, 2018
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