itrausch
39
Apr 2, 2017
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Can it do celsius as well or just american degrees? And is it suitabe or available in 230V?
Apr 2, 2017
NavyCapt
1
Apr 2, 2017
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If it is made for the American market, it is probably only 110 v. but we will have to wait on the official offer to see since many items made overseas are suitable for both. However, I traveled a LOT during my Navy career, and I was never without a voltage converter to protect me from frying my laptop, phone, and razor. They are not all that expensive and should work nicely if this particular version was not originally made for higher voltages. Just a thought, anyway...
Apr 2, 2017
gs40
5
Apr 2, 2017
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I have one - can be set to either C or F. But is 110-120V. I think there is a 230V available but can't say about the drop. The last coupon from Anova was $50 off of msrp on bluetooth edition.
Note that Electrolux is agreed to acquire Anova. Not sure how that affects matters.
Apr 2, 2017
Cloaca
1865
Apr 3, 2017
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I have an Anova generation 1 (the original, built-like-a-brick-shithouse model), and it's switchable between centigrade and fahrenheit, and it works fine in Japan (100 V, 50 Hz).
On the other hand, sous vide is overhyped. Like slow cookers and pressure cookers, you'll find it's good for a very small number of things. For me, being able to make onsen tamago eggs is the one thing I use it for now. If you like super rare meat, it's good, but why does the temperature of the entire slab of meat have to be the same exact temperature? In Japan we can eat beef, and even chicken, raw, because of better sanitation controls in production, so we just cook meat lightly if we like it really rare. And sous vide vegetables are just a waste of time. Summary: There's a strong placebo factor at work among sous vide advocates.
Apr 3, 2017
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