Jan 19, 2019195 views

3 Mystery pens.

During my recent stay in Germany a friend of mine gave me 3 pens he had no use for. I've never heard of any of them and I wonder if I should (or can) fix them. The first pen is "HARO" branded and uses a "Dauerfeder" nib. It uses an integrated piston converter.The second lacks any branding, and lacks any filling system I could see. The third has a broken nib, has no branding and has a piston filling system. Any info you could have on any of these pens is greatly appreciated.
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I wonder if @Theroc can help...
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Good news! I got new photos, this time from a slightly newer and better budget phone! (I need a camera) here are the results:
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spas787
OK, so there seems to be a mismatch between your ordering in the original description and the order in which the photos were displayed. I'd say that the taller blue and black fountain pen (with no filling mechanism) is a Chinese pen after all. Can't be sure without sharp close-ups, though. The one with the Dauerfeder (German for Dura-nib) is probably a 1950s school pen, although I've never seen one with flat cap and end cap. The few I've seen have rounded ends. Most Haros found in collector's today have glass nibs. The one with the hooded nib... anybody's guess, reminds me of early Lamys and Pelikan P1 or P15 but it's none of those. You might want to take your inquiry to fountainpennetwork.com.
(Edited)
I'm afraid they're going to stay a mystery until you find a better camera! No offense but ID-ing a pen is all about the details and some of those details require good light, strong magnification, and sharp focus; three things lacking in each of your shots. The details needed are usually on the clip, the nib and occasionally stamped or engraved on the barrel, so you have to position the pens such that those areas are pointing toward your lens (don't let them roll over on their side) while your light source falls directly onto the area you're trying to focus on. That said, photo number Three either is, or is trying to be, one of Parker's better know shrouded nib models (most likely a Parker '51' or it's lowly step cousin, the Parker 21. There were plenty of copies and knock-off versions made in Europe, so without a better photo, we can't be positive. I would suggest you do some Googling--Parker 51 info is plentiful on the web--and see what you turn up. Good luck!