Cab00s3
10
Oct 19, 2017
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What is the best way to sharpen a knife without getting out my sharpening stone?
Oct 19, 2017
ChefCoast
5
Oct 19, 2017
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The best way to keep your knife sharp is to regularly hone after each use. When you hone, it realigns the steel along the blade. If you do this, make sure you are doing it at the right angle every time. This will prolong the edge of your blade without having to get out your whetstone but down the road, it will be necessary.
Oct 19, 2017
Cab00s3
10
Oct 19, 2017
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Thanks!
Oct 19, 2017
btimup
45
Oct 19, 2017
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To add to that, try not to use any sort of pull sharpener as these take too much metal off the knife, and will start to change the profile of your edge. But if you are going to go that route, make sure that the sharpener matches the angle and symmetry of your blade. I've seen people using a symmetrical sharpener or an asymmetrical edge and I just about fainted haha
Oct 19, 2017
datGnomeLife
29
Dec 1, 2017
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The bottom of a ceramic mug
Dec 1, 2017
btimup
45
Dec 1, 2017
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That doesn't actually sharpen the blade, but it's a great way to hone the edge!
Dec 1, 2017
datGnomeLife
29
Dec 2, 2017
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I generally do agree with you but the trick is to make sure the buttom is unglazed and has some texture. It actually removes a fair bit of steel and you can see the swarf on the rim. I have used this in a pinch at friends houses when a honing steel fails to make a difference But I would never do this on my knives ! Here is where I first saw it, cheers! http://www.seriouseats.com/2017/09/how-to-sharpen-a-knife-on-a-mug.html
Dec 2, 2017
DanielRJackson
10
Dec 30, 2018
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If we're being pedantic, honing is sharpening is whetting is honing. It all means the same thing, and if you look at micrographs even a steel is actually removing material: https://scienceofsharp.wordpress.com/2018/08/22/what-does-steeling-do-part-1/ If you've got a severely rolled edge and you use pressure to straighten it, sure, that's a different process than setting a bevel with abrasives. Burnishing is a word that's meaningfully different from hone/sharpen, but we're probably well past the point where we can get it adopted. The maintenance steps we take on slightly worn edge to get it back to a refined apex are all accomplishing the same thing. Certainly the difference between the bottom of a ceramic mug and a sharpmaker rod or a crock stick is minimal.
Dec 30, 2018
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