b9d9ffdad3ac59e7f6f
135
Oct 19, 2017
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I've been liberally borrowing from other cultures. Not even in a fusiony way. But when you consider what roles an ingredient plays in that cuisine, simply transfer it to the same role in yours. Protein is protein, starch is starch, flavor is flavor.
So lately I've been having a lot of fun with the wide variety of noodles out there. Rice, green bean, mung bean, egg, good old water and wheat, and all the shapes they can take. Some absorb sauce, some don't, some take oil on as a sheen, just gotta experiment sometimes. But it certainly helps to have had experience and build technique with them. So do the canonical dish first, then figure out how you can incorporate different ingredients.
I've had success rediscovering vegetables and exploring new ones. Many of them open up in new ways given our current infrastructure and technology. Many vegetables are derived from the same ancestor (e.g., Brassica, nightshade) so can be somewhat interchangeable.
Some preparations are always good. I've dumped all manner of protein and starch together and added a spicy coconut milk-ginger sauce. There's just no way that can't be good.
Oct 19, 2017
payodpanda
931
Oct 21, 2017
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"spicy coconut milk-ginger sauce"
Now that is something I'd like to try. Is this something you make yourself or is it store-bought?
I am still learning about various cuisines (just started living by myself a couple months ago) but yes I agree with what you said about the roles of ingredients in dishes. I tend to think of recipes that way too--instead of thinking about specific ingredients in recipes, I usually think about "hmmm what is this thing doing in the recipe?" and then try and think of other things that _I think_ might do the same thing. I think it comes with practice--I don't think I'm very good at this haha. But this is great advice, thanks!
Oct 21, 2017
b9d9ffdad3ac59e7f6f
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Oct 21, 2017
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It's made from some shortcuts. For 4 servings, mince 2 Tbl ginger, 1-12 cloves ginger, saute until fragrant (about 1 minute). Add 1 can coconut milk (light is fine), make sure to include the creme at the top and mix. Add 1 tsp sugar and cayenne to taste. Let simmer until the flavors meld.
If you have Chili Garlic sauce you can put in 2 Tbl of that and omit the ginger, sugar, and cayenne. Don't know what Chili Garlic sauce is? Check out this link: http://www.eatitatlanta.com/2008/10/30/chili-sauces-explained-sriracha-sambal-oelek-and-chili-garlic-sauce/ To me, sriracha is a condiment, while sambal oelek and chili garlic are cooking ingredients. Sambal oelek has more flavor-neutral heat while chili garlic is heat + garlic.
Oct 21, 2017
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