joeyak
1
Oct 27, 2017
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When making pour over coffee, is there a secret to getting a good bloom? I typically pour enough water to saturate the grinds, but I don't see much CO2 escaping (just a few displaced coffee ground divets). I'm using a roughly sea salt sized grind, but I'm not measuring everything with a scale. Should I use a scale and use a specific amount of water? Is it better to somehow plug the end of the dripper and seep the grounds for a few seconds?
Oct 27, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Oct 27, 2017
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Fresh coffee. That's it!
Oct 27, 2017
CallieT
13
Oct 27, 2017
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Fresh coffee. Coffee has a three week life span. After that you will visible see the oils coming out of the coffee to the surface of the bean (will look shiny, that’s the flavour going). From roast date it needs a few days to degas, but don’t ever be afraid to experiment. Try the coffee throughyour it’s lifecycle and see how you prefer it. Coffee is a super complex thing but don’t let people deter you. I’ve had coffee months old I found up the back of couples that made a decent chemex and a pretty good cold press. It’s just us coffee freaks are after perfection.
Oct 27, 2017
steverhinehart
24
Oct 27, 2017
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Blooming is something that came about to handle how fresh coffee interacts with water. We bloom a brew because there's a lot of gas inside the bean structure that comes out when the hot water hits it. The idea is that that gas prevents some of the extraction early on, and this can be mitigated by wetting the grinds, allowing the gas to escape, before proceeding with the brew. If your coffee is older and doesn't seem to be blooming when you wet it, then just go ahead and brew! Should be fine regardless.
Oct 27, 2017
joeyak
1
Oct 30, 2017
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Went to the roastery down the street and picked up some fresh beans. That really made a difference!
Oct 30, 2017
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