iGeekz
8
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Is there any difference in taste between cold drip and cold brew? How many days both of them still in good taste if we put in refrigerator?.
Oct 27, 2017
szaslan
1
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Absolutely! Since cold brew is left to steep over a long period of time, the taste is usually less acidic and smoother than regular drip coffee.
Oct 27, 2017
iGeekz
8
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
What do you mean by regular drip? Is that regular pour over like V60, kalita, etc?
This following image is cold brew
search
and this image is cold drip that I talking about
search
Are they the same in taste?
Oct 27, 2017
iGeekz
8
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
I am sorry if the images not showing. I replying your comment using my phone.
Oct 27, 2017
steverhinehart
24
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
Generally they're different in flavor, but it depends a little on the recipe. Cold drip is produced in a shorter period of time than immersed cold brew (typically), and the flavor tends to be a little brighter. It's tough to compare the two without looking at specific recipes however, so I couldn't say which is stronger, more flavorful, etc.
Oct 27, 2017
doc955
1
Oct 27, 2017
bookmark_border
The images show up just fine.
Oct 27, 2017
smoyer
160
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
My cold drip brewer takes about 14 hours to make a litre of coffee (at around 2 seconds per drop) when it's at room temperature. If I put it in the refrigerator (this is actually preferable) then it takes much longer. If you put cold brew in the refrigerator for the same length of time, the taste is very similar. I think the difference most people notice is that if you run the cold drip brewer at room temperature, the coffee in the carafe assumes room temperature rather quickly and it starts its fermetation process. Those rows of cold drip brewers you see at some really upscale coffee shops are a marketing gimick if your goal is to taste only the coffee without the parafins or fermentation products.
Oct 28, 2017
iGeekz
8
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
Which one is better, put the brewer in the refrigerator or room temperature? I think room temperature is better for the fermentation process.
Oct 28, 2017
smoyer
160
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
Purists don't think coffee should be fermented at all - and if you brew it hot or cold, you won't get fermentation. If you like the taste better with a bit of fermentation, then that's better for you. Just like wine drinking, you can't let someone else tell you what you should like as your taste buds are not obligated to agree.
If you want to try out ice dripped coffee cheaply ($25), Iwaki makes a brewer that will suffice - http://amzn.to/2zeeQgs. This brewer has no drip control and is too fast if you fill it with ice and water as the instructions dictate. Instead use only ice and let the melt rate of the ice slow the drip rate down. The cup shaped grounds basket also has problems wetting the grounds. To solve this issue, place the full basket on a flat surface and compress the grounds slightly. This brewer fits in about the same space as a 2l bottle of soda so you can put it in the refrigerator or brew your ice-drip on the counter.
If you want to try out New Orleans style ice brew (batch) cheaply, simply put two parts water and one part coffee in a zip-lock bag and throw it in the refrigerator. Filter it using another coffee maker's filter system (drip, pour-over, Aero-Press).
In both cases, you're making concentrate. If you drink it straight it's going to be about the strength of espresso but you can dilute it with hot water to make coffee, pour it over ice to make iced coffee, etc. Trader Joe's (in the US) also has a pretty good ice brew concentrate that's then packaged in a way that won't ferment - once you open it, keep it in the fridge - https://www.traderjoes.com/digin/post/organic-french-roast-cold-brew-coffee-concentrate.
Through all this, don't forget the goal is to produce a cup of coffee you enjoy. Brewed cold and prohibiting fermentation will allow you to taste the coffee's natural flavors (though the parafins that give a bitter edge to hot-brewed coffee are natural too), but I never seem to experience coffee the same way the bean roaster does. One local shop has a coffee I really like that's labeled cocoa, caramel, lemon, grape but no matter how I brew it, I don't taste a hint of lemon or grape. Again - it's your taste buds you're trying to please.
EDIT: I just found (and ordered) this ice-drip brewer on Amazon - http://amzn.to/2ylnYji. It's got a drip rate control and stainless steel filter which should make it easier to control the brewing. I'm guessing this basket will have the same problem wetting the grounds but we already know the solution to that. I should also note that I built a tower style ice-drip coffee brewer using laboratory grade glassware (I work at a university) and they can be unwieldy - if you want to use it as a piece of art in your kitchen, it will always be visible (my wife wasn't thrilled). You'll never get one in your refrigerator though.
Oct 28, 2017
iGeekz
8
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
Thank you, Sir for the enlightenment. All this time if I want to drink ice coffee, I make it using V60 with ice in the server. I want to try something else. I need coffee that I can keep for several days and always ready if I want it.
Oct 28, 2017
smoyer
160
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
My "normal" cup of coffee is brewed in a French press with water at around 170F. I grind fresh beans with a Hario ceramic burr grinder (http://amzn.to/2iaRYn3) and steep (on average) about 6 minutes. I like the slightly bitter edge with hot brewed coffee. This also works well on my boat, where heating is relatively easy (propane) but refrigeration is hard and freezing is impossible - I don't even bother trying to make ice-brew on the boat. Since my wife is a tea drinker, heating a kettle of water works for the French press and steeping her tea.
If you need coffee that will keep for several days without refrigeration, I think you'll need to can it somehow. A little fermentation might add flavor but mold floating on the top isn't too appealing.
EDIT: iGeekz needs a bit of reputation ;)
Oct 28, 2017
Jermeh
5
Oct 28, 2017
bookmark_border
My cold drip doesn't taste as bold as when I do normal cold brew, though it still is strong caffeine wise. I would almost describe my cold drip as light and refreshing.
I've never had any turn bad before I could finish it either. I've kept both cold brews for 2 weeks without any issues.
Oct 28, 2017
kingfisher
14
Oct 31, 2017
bookmark_border
If you get those survival water boxes that keep liquid in an internal Mylar bag (box-wine bags work, but the boxes are usually better than the wine!), driving out all the air, you can keep cold brewed coffee for a very long time in the refrigerator.
I learned this this as a photo color lab tech before digital. I could store color developers, notoriously perishable, for at least a year. It was an easy move to do the same with coffee.
Oct 31, 2017
iGeekz
8
Oct 31, 2017
bookmark_border
I don't need to keep the cold brew coffee for very long time, just one or two weeks is enough. Thanks for the suggestion anyway.
Oct 31, 2017
smoyer
160
Nov 1, 2017
bookmark_border
I just brewed my first pot of coffee in the inexpensive ice-drip brewer I mentioned purchasing above (http://amzn.to/2ylnYji). The drip control is nice and the stainless filter is better than the polypropylene filter in the Iwaki version. This makes my new Osaka brewer easier to set up but with the same amount/grind of coffee and the same drip rate, they produce equivalent coffee. My opinion is that the drip rate control is worth the extra five dollars (US).
Nov 1, 2017
iGeekz
8
Nov 1, 2017
bookmark_border
Your link goes to shopping cart, Sir. So I don't know what the ice-drip brewer that you mentioned looks a like. Could you give me the name so I can search it by myself?
Nov 1, 2017
smoyer
160
Nov 1, 2017
bookmark_border
Sorry about that ... if I'm logged in it goes to the page I expect so clearly their link shortener didn't do what I expected. I've edited and tested the links above and now they should go to the correct page.
Nov 1, 2017
iGeekz
8
Nov 1, 2017
bookmark_border
Unfortunately that item does not ship to my country. There are some ice-drip brewer with drip control that sell in my country but more expensive than this one. I will try to buy one of them.
Nov 1, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Nov 1, 2017
bookmark_border
They are both "cold brew" - one is a fancy "bucket cold brew" device and the other is, as you say, "cold drip". Bucket brew has a tendency to have a fuller mouthfeel and a little smoother, less accentuated flavor. Cold drip will get more distinct flavors from the beans and be somewhat thinner in mouthfeel.
Nov 1, 2017
jkiemele
222
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
I just wanted to mention another style of cold coffee. I didn't see it while reading through the comments so forgive me if I am duplicating a response. There is a Japanese iced coffee method where you make a concentrated hot coffee and have it drip directly onto ice, cooling it instantly. I usually do it via Chemex or Aeropress. The taste difference between it and traditional immersion cold brew is clear. Both are great, but both bring out different notes. The Japanese iced is more complex, the cold immersion is smoother. It's been a while since I've done side by side comparison of the two methods with same beans. The benefit of the Japanese iced is that it takes only as long as it does to make a Chemex, Aeropress, etc....
Nov 3, 2017
iGeekz
8
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
I already mentioned it in my comment, I make it using V60 with ice in the server. I never use Japanese method with Chemex or Aeropress. Maybe I will use Chemex or Aeropress for next time. I ask about cold brew or cold drip because I want to make ice coffee not only 1 or 2 cups but I want to make it let say 1 liter and keep it in the fridge. So, when I need just a sip or two, I just take it out from the fridge. Anyway, thanks for the suggestion using Chemex or Aeropress on Japanese method. I will try it.
Nov 3, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
Try doing a medium coarse grind and putting the coffee in a bucket or tupperware container or whatever. 1 part coffee to 4 parts water (1:4 ratio). E.g. if you have 180g coffee, add 720g water. Let that sit covered in the fridge for 20-24 hours. Pour into a separate container through a thick piece of cheesecloth (4-8 layers minimum).
That process will give you a concentrate that you can dilute to taste. A 1:2 ratio is a good place to start. Way cheaper to start this way then move into more complicated machines/glassware.
Nov 3, 2017
iGeekz
8
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
Thank you, Sir, for the recipe. I will try it, maybe tomorrow. :)
Nov 3, 2017
Dr.McCoy
344
Nov 3, 2017
bookmark_border
Sure thing! That can be scaled up or down as you see fit.
Nov 3, 2017
View Full Discussion