Showing 1 of 26 conversations about:
MikeMD
1091
Nov 6, 2017
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What's your favorite funnel?
I recently got 2 of the collapsible ones from crate&barrel and freaking love them! Don't take up any room and really convenient once you remember you have them lol
Nov 6, 2017
Curieux88
65
Nov 7, 2017
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I got mine at a local kitchen store for a dollar or two. Opaque white. I don’t use it often. Just to fill up my oil bottle. So it does the job
Nov 7, 2017
ExcitedByNoise
7
Nov 7, 2017
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I just use cheap ones that came in a pack of various sizes. I figure eventually they might get gross enough I want to replace them, no point in spend too much. I mostly use it for bottling sauces, so I need some small enough to fit in the various sauce bottles I use.
Nov 7, 2017
Burkyboy
7
Nov 7, 2017
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I just picked up a nice stainless steel one from crate & barrel and it's come in handy quite often! Constructed very well and cheap (under $10) plus it matches the other stainless items I have in my kitchen!
Nov 7, 2017
MikeMD
1091
Nov 7, 2017
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What type of sauces? I ask because I've been wanting to experiment with making my own hot sauce at some point. ;) I'd even like to grow the peppers, so if you have any tips I'm all ears!
Nov 7, 2017
ExcitedByNoise
7
Nov 7, 2017
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I do make hot sauce, but also of other sauces. I like alot of Asian cuisine, so I'll make teriyaki, or miso butter, or just thin out so gochujang with vinegar. Also BBQ sauces and such. I also use sauce bottles to store oils for easy squeezing and I keep little jars full of common dry ingredients like salt, sugar, and black pepper that I fill using funnels.
For hot sauce, I start with most peppers only using white vinegar and salt. Chop up the peppers with salt and let sit at room temp to ferment about a day (I haven't tried longer). Then I add vinegar and let it sit for 7-10 days at room temp. After that, puree and strain or if you want more chili solids, you can experiment with it unstrained or partially strained. I like to try this approach first with peppers, because it will put the pepper's flavor front and center. Fermenting is one of the steps I haven't played around with too much, but it would certainly be possible to let it go longer, but I need to research proper fermentation more.
I've tried using citric acid to keep jalepenos from turning ugly green, but it hasn't seemed to work well, but it's one of the additives I keep on hand. Also soy lecithin as an emulsifier to help keep them form separating. It can also be used to thicken or xanthum gum as well. It's really a preference thing there.
The rest is really up to you. Spices, garlic, and pepper blends are typical. Also some sort of citrus, fruit, or sweetener to balance flavors. I often cut hotter peppers with something, like carrots for habeneros. Also roasting the peppers can add depth and mellow them out. Smoking is also an option. Peeling the skin and/or removing ribs and seeds can also reduce heat and bitterness. Peeling is a pain though for small peppers.
I am growing some ghost and scorpion now, which is hotter than I typically go, but I'm going to see if I can make a sauce out of those.
Nov 7, 2017
MikeMD
1091
Nov 7, 2017
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You are an inspiration! Thank you for the detailed info. It makes me even more excited to give it a try :)
Nov 7, 2017
milesw
1
Nov 10, 2017
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I think I have this same one. It's thick steel, all one piece with no welds? I like it because it's easy to clean, very durable and I don't think it will ever rust or get gross. I also have a canning funnel (wide opening) that is really handy for sous vide when packing plastic bags and keeping food from touching the edges.
Nov 10, 2017
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