bchu23
8
Nov 13, 2017
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Does anyone have experience using an induction disk as a way of using incompatible pans with an induction stovetop?
I want to be able to use nonstick pans with induction, but the pans I buy are not compatible. My brief search for induction-capable nonstick pans reveals only expensive products which I am reluctant to pay up for given that nonstick pans need replacing every so often. Users' experiences with induction disks that I've found are mixed.
Nov 13, 2017
cs85b03
101
Nov 14, 2017
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I hate to say it, but you should probably just invest in a tri-ply set. Black Friday is coming up and you can get a decent set for somewhat cheap. You are going to get much more even cooking than with a disc - which is essentially just turning your induction stove top into an electrical element stove top.
As an alternate, you can transition to stainless tri-ply or cast iron and just keep one or two nonstick pans for when you need to use them. I still use nonstick to do fried eggs...
Nov 14, 2017
pixelsaurus
2
Nov 14, 2017
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I know some find them intimidating to maintain but the non stick option I use for induction is good old cast iron. A well seasoned cast iron skillet is a good option to teflon and while I will agree that teflon is more non stick than cat iron I find the ability to use low or high heat and ease of cleaning to make them a great choice. And yes, you can use soap to clean a well seasoned cast iron pan. (arguments ensue)
Nov 14, 2017
djfluffkins
130
Nov 14, 2017
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If we're on the pile of "alternatives" to induction disks. I would highly recommend considering carbon steel pans. They get hot quickly, transfer heat quickly, and cool down quickly. For some lower end induction cooktops, cast iron can retain too much heat and the units will overheat and stop working until the temperature cools down.
Carbon steel basically has similar properties to cast iron except it's built not to retain heat.
Nov 14, 2017
bchu23
8
Nov 14, 2017
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Thanks all. I agree with your suggestions and should have been more specific. I'd like to keep a nonstick pan around for eggs, etc., and was hoping to find an "easy" way to use it on induction (and avoid buying expensive tri-ply nonstick).
Nov 14, 2017
djfluffkins
130
Nov 14, 2017
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Yup, I will argue on the soap usage on the pan. It does strip away at the seasoning but more importantly it's not necessary. I'm a big fan of using chain mail now to clean away cast iron. I've also used just salt.
To be completely honest, once I had a well seasoned pan I've NEVER had sticking issues. They clean very easily. The only times I've had issues is when I haven't treated them well (like when I first started using them). I have stripped and re-seasoned a few pans that I abused in the past and they're all better than ever.
So soap at your own risk. Just remember, when the pan comes "pre-seasoned" it doesn't mean that's as non-stick as it will get.
Nov 14, 2017
djfluffkins
130
Nov 14, 2017
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So, I'm honestly not trying to derail your efforts, I went through the same issues when it came to exploring induction as an option (since my apartment only has electric).
The carbon steel pans (https://www.massdrop.com/buy/matfer-black-steel-pans) that have been on Massdrop before or can be purchased from other retailers are fairly cheap ($20 range) and will have similar non-stick potential. Now I say potential, because it is based largely on how you season, and treat the pans. I use a set of Darto carbon steel pans for every day use including eggs. My eggs will slide right off with little to no use of oil. That being said, they aren't non-stick in the sense that you drop a raw egg on it and it will immediately just slide around (depending on oil/fat usage). Sometimes it has to brown a bit to release and then you can flip and do whatever you want.
I think the reason we keep going back to this is, good induction disks exist, but they aren't cheap and they are good "for induction disks" not good all around. If you poke through the Cook's Illustrated piece (https://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment_reviews/1359-induction-interface-disks) they recommend the Max Burton Induction Interface Disk. When I was exploring, I decided not to go down this route because the disk was $50 and I could get multiple pans at that price.
Nov 14, 2017
Chef_Scot
230
Culinary Professional
Nov 15, 2017
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I love carbon steel pans! I always take a refrigerator magnet and see if it sticks to the bottom of the pan. If the magnet sticks then the pan will work on induction.
Nov 15, 2017
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