0 deg sleeping bag
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In the market for a 0 deg sleeping bag. Not hardcore backpacker right now, but might do so in the future. Prefer not to spend too much. Have been looking at the Teton Leef, Cascade Mountain Tech and Kelty. Any thoughts on them? Thank you in advance.
thumb_upJoseph Mclaughlin, CoolFeller, and 3 others
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JohnnyVirgil
3
Nov 26, 2019
If you can spend a little more, check out the REI 0 degree downtime. Duck down, but decent fill and it packs down pretty small. https://www.rei.com/product/136215/rei-co-op-down-time-0-down-sleeping-bag
(Edited)
swrewards2011
6
Nov 26, 2019
Thank you!
ekeim
13
Nov 26, 2019
Kelty is a decent brand. Also consider Alps. Alps has a good mummy-style bag that helps retain body heat. Alps bags are relatively affordable (I think I got mine on sale at Costco for $30) and last a long time.
swrewards2011
6
Nov 26, 2019
Thank you!
Cbslc
68
Nov 25, 2019
Of the three you mention above, I would trust Kelty the most. Teton and Cascade seem to be on the cheaper end, and I'm not sure I would trust their advertised temp ratings. I would also recommend the Marmot Trestles 0 degree. 0 degree bags are heavy, are you sure you need to go down that low? If you're car camping, you can also layer and get down to 0. You could do the well rated Kelty Cosmic 20 and get a pine throw blanket to layer. EE has a good guide to layering: https://support.enlightenedequipment.com/hc/en-us/articles/115002770588-How-to-layer-quilts-for-sub-zero-camping Also don't forget, your pad is very important, at 0 even a good insulated pad may not be enough. Think about layering your pads as well. Get a z-lite and put it under your inflatable. I have a cheapie eva foam covered in AL foil camping mat that I put under our pads. It seems to add a bit more R and covers the entire tent floor, so there is no air gap under us (2p setup)
swrewards2011
6
Nov 25, 2019
Thank you. Will check the article.
RossT
4
Nov 26, 2019
I second Cbslc's post. Those budget bags you are considering will be very heavy. If you decide to go backpacking, you may not want to carry that weight when the time comes (means "future proofing" this purchase for possibly going winter backpacking is a bit pointless) and if its for car camping, where weight and transportation wont matter, you could get a decent bag rated around 20 or 30 degrees that you could supplement via layering if the temps called for it, either using clothes or a quilt of some kind. Again if its car camping, could literally take a heavy quilt/throw from your living room and throw it in the car. If you get into backpacking and need to layer, you could look at budget quilt options like the double-black-diamond quilt at costco (might be the "Blue Ridge ACTIV" down quilt now). Either way, only like $25 per and adds about 1b to you current sleep kit. For that 1lb, math works out like so: 700 fill power * 7 oz fill = 4900 ml...divided out by a 60"x70" quilt (the Blue Ridge Activ dimensions) = 1.16" of loft. For reference, 1" of loft added to a 20 or 30 degree sleeping bag adds about 20 degrees of warmth (generally accepted rule of thumb, obviously not scientific though). Finally, getting back to your original question, I'd also highly consider any REI options out there (JohnnyVirgil mentioned one). REI is a fantastic company, responsibly sources their down, submits to EN testing and "pays it forward" in the outdoor community. In addition, their return policy and warranty is among the best in the industry. If you or someone you know are a member, you can use a 20% off coupon. Otherwise, if you purchase REI Co-op branded items, you can get 15% off a one time purchase Im pretty sure (customer service could confirm that). Finally, I believe they generally put REI Co-op branded products on sale, ~25% or so, during their annual sales. Just more to consider when looking at prices.