[Jelly Key] 8-bit series ii: pipeline bots artisan keycaps

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https://www.jellykey.com/artisan-keycaps/8-bit-series-ii
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A garden full of cherry in the 8-bit yard What drives us to produce a sequel to this pixelated 8-bit collection is entirely your love and cherished feedback when you receive the previous keycaps. Those who owned and loved the 8-bit series keycap have sent many requests about making cherry profile keycaps, and for that, we’re much appreciated it. We have 5 primary colors with lots of shades. There’s been an upgrade in this 2nd version that we guess you might like to add another positive note. Back in the 1st 8-bit series, most of the sizes were SA profile, leaving only 2 cherry sizes. With the Pipeline Bots comeback, we have made a full cherry profile for this series, including 7 sizes (1u / 1.25u ctrl,alt / 1,5u tab, \ / 2u / 2.25u Enter / 2.75u right shift / 6.25u Spacebar ), 4 game scenes, and 5 colors! 
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How did these all become alive? As the story of Pipeline Bots unfolds completely, it is time we tell you what our artisans did to make them all come to life, in a what that’s as dynamic as this. Before we start with the first step, there is an important note that you need to know: we entirely focus on making cherry profiles for this collection. Thrilled enough? Let’s go make it! Cast, cast, and cast The casting part is a bit different from the previous version of 8-bit. We cast the base in colour layers, each of which needs approximately 8-10 hours to dry and be ready for the next step. On average, there are 2-3 layers of colours for each keycap, so it requires an additional 60 minutes to craft each layer. Doing the math, it takes roughly 18-20 hours to have a finished base, in a total of 35 bases in this collection. And all of that is just for the base. We still have the inside characters to deal with. These vital babies were also cast in 8-10 hours in 35 colours, and their size was incredibly condensed to just 0.9 – 4.6 mm. With such a small measurement, the success rate of having qualified pieces is also low.
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When the bases and details were completed, it’s time to throw some shades on them! But we need to remove them out of the moulds after drying first. They then underwent a thorough cleaning process so that we can start painting properly. For the bases, this would highlight the block for the colour layers that were previously cast. After that, we move on to colouring the characters. With the size as small as hair, the challenge here is real. Our craftsmen must also make sure that you can recognise many different city scenes. The paints we used for this collection were extremely complicated as well. There are 8-9 primary coloured paints for the whole scene of the keycaps, not to mention many other combinations made by mixing colours from 2 among these to create a more diverse and interactive effect. The number of characters in the 8-bit II collection is astonishing, reaching up to 74, with 4 game scenes and seven sizes for each scene. Securing these details requires absolute focus and attention as a single mistake in this step will distort the original design and cost the entire work before that. After spending 30 hours finishing the bases and characters, we move on to pouring the outer resin layer to shape the keycaps and put them in the pressure cooker. At this point, we continue to wait 16-18 hours for them to complete. The final touches were proper cleaning, quality control, and packaging. After this, they’re ready to be yours!
See more at: https://www.jellykey.com/artisan-keycaps/8-bit-series-ii
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I have just updated the video of this collection: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SRtz-Fv30I&t=85s